ATIFlash / AMD VBFlash 2.93 (BIOS Flashing AMD GPUs

Would someone help me set up Bitcoin to work in Windows with my two ATi FirePro video cards?

Would 2 bitcoins be worth it? I have one to pay now - and will have a second in a week or so.
submitted by acusticthoughts to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

XFX ATI Radeon HD 7950 (3072 MB) (FX795ATDBC) Graphics Card is for sale on cryptothrift.com for Bitcoin and Litecoin https://cryptothrift.com/auctions/crypto-mining-gpu/xfx-ati-radeon-hd-7950-3072-mb-fx795atdbc-graphics-card-2/

XFX ATI Radeon HD 7950 (3072 MB) (FX795ATDBC) Graphics Card is for sale on cryptothrift.com for Bitcoin and Litecoin https://cryptothrift.com/auctions/crypto-mining-gpu/xfx-ati-radeon-hd-7950-3072-mb-fx795atdbc-graphics-card-2/ submitted by duetschpire to cryptothrift [link] [comments]

XFX ATI Radeon HD 5870 1GB Video Card -DOES NOT WORK- is for sale on cryptothrift.com for Bitcoin and Litecoin https://cryptothrift.com/auctions/computer-hardware/xfx-ati-radeon-hd-5870-1gb-video-card-does-not-work/

submitted by duetschpire to cryptothrift [link] [comments]

XFX ATI Radeon HD 5870 1GB Video Card -DOES NOT WORK- is for sale on cryptothrift.com for Bitcoin and Litecoin https://cryptothrift.com/auctions/computer-hardware/xfx-ati-radeon-hd-5870-1gb-does-not-work/

XFX ATI Radeon HD 5870 1GB Video Card -DOES NOT WORK- is for sale on cryptothrift.com for Bitcoin and Litecoin https://cryptothrift.com/auctions/computer-hardware/xfx-ati-radeon-hd-5870-1gb-does-not-work/ submitted by duetschpire to cryptothrift [link] [comments]

[Part - 31] Large college ebooks/eTextbooks thread for cheap rates [$4 to $25]

  1. American Government and Politics Today 2017-2018 Edition: The Essentials
  2. Algorithmic diagnosis of signs and symptoms
  3. American English Idiomatic Expressions part 2: English idioms and Phrases with
  4. ABC's of Relationship Selling through Service 12th edition
  5. Auditing & Assurance Services 7th Edition by Louwers
  6. AIDS: The Biological Basis 6th Edition
  7. Advertising: Concept and Copy 3E
  8. Analyzing Text and Discourse: Eight Approaches for the Social Sciences
  9. A Few Lessons for Investors and Managers From Warren Buffett – Peter Bevelin
  10. Applied Logistic Regression 3rd Edition
  11. American History: Connecting with the Past Volume 2 From 1865 15th Edition
  12. Accidental Orientalists: Modern Italian Travelers in Ottoman Lands
  13. Accounting for Non Specialists 7th Australian Edition - Test Bank
  14. Abnormal Psychology: An Integrative Approach 5th Canadian Edition
  15. American Politics Today Essentials 6th Edition
  16. Adobe Photoshop CC Classroom in a book 2017 release
  17. A+ Guide to IT Technical Support 9th Edition
  18. Armstrong's Handbook of Strategic Human Resource Management
  19. Applied State Estimation and Association
  20. Ageing and Pension Reform Around the World, Evidence from Eleven Countries
  21. A2-Level Maths for Edexcel - Core 4
  22. Adobe After Effects CC Classroom in a Book (2018 release
  23. An Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research: Theory and Practice
  24. A Companion to the Anthropology of Education 2016 version
  25. Art History 6th Edition by Marilyn Stokstad
  26. Archaeology Essentials: Theories, Methods, and Practice 3rd Edition
  27. Air Pollution Control Engineering 3rd Edition
  28. A Brief Guide to Writing from Readings 7th Edition
  29. Ayurvedic Tongue Diagnosis
  30. An Introduction to Geosynthetic Engineering - Sanjay Kumar Shukla
  31. A History of England, Volume 2
  32. A Short Course in Medical Terminology 3rd Edition
  33. Algebra and Trigonometry 10th Edition
  34. Acqua Alta: A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery (Commissario Brunetti Book 5)
  35. A Wellness Way of Life 11th Edition
  36. A Concise Introduction to Logic 13th Edition
  37. Amman Gulf Capital Identity and Contemporary Megaprojects
  38. American History: Connecting with the Past 15th edition
  39. A History of Infamy - Crime, Truth, and Justice in Mexico
  40. A Quick Reference to Business Analysis
  41. Applied Computational Aerodynamics: A Modern Engineering Approach
  42. An Introduction to Six Sigma and Process Improvement 2nd Edition
  43. A Guide tO SQL 9th Edition
  44. A-Level Business_ AQA Year 1 & 2 Complete Revision & Practice (CGP A-Level Business) - CGP Books
  45. Abnormal Psychology 8th Edition by Thomas Olttmans
  46. A Guide to MySQL (Sam 2010 Compatible Products)
  47. Alcoholism and the family a guide to treatment and prevention 2nd Edition
  48. Auditing and Assurance Services: Understanding the Integrated Audit
  49. Anatomy: An Essential Textbook - Latin Nomenclature
  50. Advanced Problems in Physical Chemistry For Competitive Examinations
  51. Acupuncture: An Anatomical Approach 2nd edition
  52. A Phonetics Workbook for Students: Building a Foundation for Transcription – Heidi
  53. Art-Museums - International Relations where we Least Expect IT
  54. An Introduction to Business Ethics 5th edition
  55. Andrews’ Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Atlas
  56. An Introduction to Project Management 6th Edition by Kathy Schwalbe
  57. A Concise Introduction to World Religion, 3rd Edition
  58. A Small Person Far Away
  59. Applied Statistics for Engineers and Physical Scientists 3rd Editio
  60. Applied Mineral Inventory Estimation
  61. Aging and The Life Course: An Introduction to Social Gerontology 6th Edition
  62. Analytics and Decision Support in Health Care Operations Management 3rd Edition
  63. Atlas of Anatomy, Latin Nomenclature 3rd Edition by Anne M Gilroy
  64. AQA GCSE Maths Higher Student Book
  65. Accounting Information Systems 8th Edition by James A. Hall
  66. Anthills of the Savannah
  67. Applied Statistics Using Stata: A Guide for the Social Sciences
  68. Analyzing Syntaxt: A Lexical-Fungtional Approach
  69. An Introduction To Law and Economics 5th Edition
  70. Art in Indonesia
  71. An Introduction to Drugs and the Neuroscience of Behavior
  72. Adult Development and Aging 8th Edition by John C. Cavanaugh
  73. A First Course in Probability 9th Edition
  74. A2-Level Maths Complete Revision & Practice - CGP Books
  75. A New History of Animation
  76. Administrative Law for Public Managers 2nd Edition
  77. ASTD Handbook for Workplace Learning Professionals- Elaine Biech
  78. Aphasia Rehabilitation Clinical Challenges
  79. Alloying: Understanding the Basics
  80. Advertising: An Integrated Marketing Communication Perspective 3rd Edition
  81. An Islandwide Struggle for Freedom
  82. American Jesus. How the Son of God Became a National Icon
  83. Accounting for Decision Making and Control 9th Edition
  84. Atlas of Anatomy 3rd Edition
  85. Admission Assessment Exam Review: HESI 4th Edition
  86. A2-Level Maths for Edexcel - Core 3 Student Book
  87. American Social Welfare Policy: A Pluralist Approach 7th Edition
  88. Advanced Practice Nursing: Essentials for Role Development 3rd Edition
  89. Affective Neuroscience: The Foundations of Human and Animal Emotions
  90. Advancing Your Career: Concepts of Professional Nursing 5th Edition
  91. Accounting for Non Specialists 7th Australian Edition
  92. American Politics Today Essentials 5th Edition
  93. Atkins' Physical Chemistry 11th Edition by Peter Atkins
  94. Against Individualism: A Confucian Rethinking of the Foundations of Morality, Politics, Family and Religion
  95. Advertising & IMC: Principles and Practice 10th Edition
  96. Aging and Older Adulthood 3rd Edition
  97. American Drama 1945 - 2000. An Introduction
  98. A Regional Geography of the United States and Canada Toward a Sustainable Future
  99. Anatomy & Physiology 6th Edition by Elaine N. Marieb
  100. A Force So Swift
  101. Android Programming for Beginners by John Horton
  102. Assessment of Communication Disorders in Adults
  103. Animal Rights Human Rights: Entanglements of Oppression and Liberation
  104. American Corrections 10th Edition
  105. Android Programming for Developers
  106. Advanced Engine Performance Diagnosis 6th Edition by James D. Halderman
  107. A History of Western Society Since 1300 11th Edition
  108. An Introduction to Management Science: Quantitative Approaches to Decision Making14th Edition
  109. Australian Intellectual Property Commentary Law and Practice 2nd Edition
  110. A Creative Approach to Music Fundamentals 11th Edition
  111. Advanced Screenwriting Raising Your Script to the Academy Award Level
  112. Arduino Project Handbook_ 25 Practical Projects to Get You Started - Mark Geddes
  113. A Dictionary of Science (Oxford - Jonathan Law
  114. And Then You're Dead: What Really Happens If You Get Swallowed by a Whale, Are Shot from a Cannon, or Go Barreling over Niagara
  115. America and its peoples: a mosaic in the making 4th Edition
  116. Analysis of Algorithms: An Active Learning Approach 2nd edition
  117. Adult Development and Aging: Biopsychosocial Perspectives, 5th Edition
  118. Auditing and Assurance Services 16th Edition
  119. An Introduction to the Human Services 8th Edition
  120. Animals and the Moral Community
  121. A Guide to Genetic Counseling 2nd Edition
  122. Arguing for Our Lives
  123. Analysis: With An Introduction to Proof 5th Edition
  124. Analysis: with an Introduction to Proof 5th Edition Solution Manual
  125. Art of Problem Solving Introduction to Algebra Textbook and Solutions Manual 2-Book Set
  126. Approaches to Early Childhood Education 6th Edition
  127. An Introduction to Moral Philosophy by Jonathan Wolff
  128. An introduction to formal languages and automata, 6th Edition
  129. Applying Career Development Theory to Counseling 6th Edition
  130. Abnormal psychology: neuroscience perspectives on human experience 2nd Edition
  131. Aircraft Propulsion and Gas Turbine Engines 2nd Edition
  132. An Introduction to Human Services: Policy and Practice 8th Edition
  133. Aspen Handbook for Legal Writers: A Practical Reference 4th Edition
  134. Armstrong's Handbook of Performance Management 6th Edition
  135. Americanah
  136. An Introduction to Brain and Behavior 5th Edition
  137. Abnormal Psychology: The Science and Treatment of Psychological Disorders 13th Edition
  138. Algebra for College Students 8th Edition
  139. Analysis of Electromagnetic Fields and Wave
  140. Adaptation in Metapopulations: How Interaction Changes Evolution
  141. African American Psychology: From Africa to America 3rd Edition
  142. A Collection of Ranter Writings
  143. A Good Country by Laleh Khadivi
  144. A History of the Roman People 6th Edition
  145. A Guide to Qualitative Field Research 2nd Edition
  146. A Comprehensive Guide to Daoist Nei Gong
  147. Algebra with trigonometry for college students 2nd Edition
  148. Advanced Accounting 12th Edition by Paul M. Fischer
  149. ADempiere 3.4 ERP Solutions
  150. Assessment, Measurement, and Prediction for Personnel Decisions, 2nd Edition
  151. AO Principles of Fracture Management 3rd Edition Volume 1 & 2
  152. ASP Safety Fundamentals Exam Secrets Study Guide: ASP Test Review for the Associate Safety Professional Exam
  153. A First Course in Differential Equation with Modeling Applications 11th Edition
  154. An Invitation to Health: The Power of Now Dianne Hales 17th Edition
  155. Arias Practical Guide to High Risk Pregnancy and Delivery 4th Edition
  156. A+ Guide to Hardware 9th Edition
  157. A Dictionary of Biology 7th Edition
  158. Autodesk Maya 2018: Basics Guide
  159. Accounting for Governmental & Nonprofit Entities 17th Edition
  160. An Introduction to the Profession of Social Work 6th Edition
  161. Absolute Java (Global Edition)
  162. A Cultural History of Food in the Medieval Age
  163. Always by Your Side by Gaynor Carrillo
  164. Analysis, Synthesis and Design of Chemical Processes 4th Edition
  165. Abernathy's Surgical Secrets 7th Edition
  166. An Invitation to Environmental Sociology 5th Edition
  167. Abnormal Psychology in a Changing World, 9th Edition
  168. Applied Longitudinal data analysis : modeling change and event occurrence
  169. An Introduction to Management Science: Quantitative Approaches to Decision Making 15th Edition
  170. Audio Power Amplifier Design 6th Edition
  171. Attention in a Social World
  172. Animal Behavior 11th edition
  173. Accounting Information Systems 13th Edition
  174. Alternating Projection Methods
  175. Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research - Volume 17
  176. Anatomy and Physiology: An Integrative Approach 3rd Edition
  177. A Place to Stand
  178. A Study Guide for Kate Chopin's "Story of an Hour"
  179. Authority and enterprise among the peoples of South Sulawesi : introduction – Roger
  180. Advancing Vocabulary Skills 3rd Edition
  181. Anatomy: A Photographic Atlas 8th Edition
  182. Adolescence 11th Edition
  183. Advanced Pediatric Assessment 2nd Edition
  184. Agile project management quickstart guide a simplified beginners guide to agile project Management
  185. An Introduction to Group Work Practice 8th Edition
  186. A Dialogue on Personal Identity and Immortality
  187. A Framework for Human Resource Management 7th Edition
  188. Accounting Information Systems, Global Edition, 14th Edition
  189. Applied Regression Analysis and Other Multivariable Methods 5th Edition
  190. Atlantic Africa and the Spanish Caribbean, 1570-1640 – David Wheat
  191. ACSM’s Exercise is MedicineTM: A Clinician’s Guide to Exercise Prescription
  192. AO Manual of Fracture Management: Internal Fixators: Concepts and Cases using LCP/LISS – Michael Wagner
  193. An Emotionally Focused Workbook for Couples: The Two of Us
  194. A Man and His Presidents: The Political Odyssey of William F. Buckley Jr
  195. Adobe LiveCycle Designer 2nd Edition
  196. A Temporary Gift by Asmaa Hussein
  197. A Novel Multi-Criteria Decision Making Model
  198. American College Slang for International Students
  199. Applying Political Theory: Issues and Debates 2nd Edition
  200. A Study Guide for Khaled Hosseini's "A Thousand Splendid Suns"
  201. Accessible American History: Connecting the Past to the Present 2nd Edition
  202. Algae-Based Biopharmaceuticals
  203. America’s History, Volume 2, 8th Edition
  204. Assessment for Reading Instruction, 3rd Edition
  205. America in European Consciousness, 1493-1750
  206. AS-Level Maths for Edexcel - Core 2 Student Book
  207. A History of Asia 7th Edition
  208. A Framework for Marketing Management 6th Edition
  209. Australian Political Institutions 10th Edition
  210. Artificial Intelligence: A Guide to Intelligent Systems 3rd Edition
  211. Absolute C++ 6th Edition by Walter Savitch
  212. Adult Learning: Linking Theory and Practice
  213. Advanced Practice Nursing: An Integrative Approach 5th Edition
  214. Analysing English Sentences 2nd Edition
  215. A2-Level Maths for Edexcel - Statistics 2 Student Book
  216. Attract, Engage & Retain Top Talent.50 Plus One Strategies
  217. Applied Mathematics for the Managerial, Life, and Social Sciences 7th Edition
  218. Activities, Games, and Assessment Strategies for the Foreign Language Classroom
  219. A Grammar of the Film - An Analysis of Film Technique
  220. A Practical Approach to Criminal Procedure 15th Edition
  221. Anatomy and Physiology: An Integrative Approach 2nd Edition
  222. Automotive Chassis Systems 7th Edition
  223. A History of European Literature: The West and the World from Antiquity to the Present
  224. American Government: Stories of a Nation
  225. Autocad Civil 3D 2010 Procedures and Application
  226. A History of Modern Psychology 11th Edition
  227. Aging in the Right Place
  228. Australian Intellectual Property Law 3rd Edition
  229. AS-Level Maths for Edexcel - Core 1
  230. ARE Secrets Study Guide: ARE Exam Review for the Architect Registration Examination
  231. Advanced Infrastructure Penetration Techniques
  232. Android Application Development Cookbook
  233. A World of Art, 8th Edition
  234. American Revolution Considered as a Social Movement
  235. A Lawyer Writes: A Practical Guide to Legal Analysis, 2nd Edition
  236. An Introduction to Environmental Sociology
  237. A Cultural History of Early Modern English Cryptography Manuals
  238. Applied Engineering Economics Using Excel by Merwan Mehta
  239. Advancing Your Career: Concepts of Professional Nursing 6th Edition
  240. An Architectural survey of Temples of Kerala – H. Sarkar
  241. Accident Investigation Techniques, 2nd Edition
  242. American Conservatism History: Theory and Practice
  243. Anti-pluralism: the real populist threat to liberal democracy
  244. Anthropology: The Human Challenge 15th Edition
  245. An Alternative History of Bicycles and Motorcycles: Two-Wheeled Transportation and Material Culture
  246. Adult Health Nursing 8th Edition
  247. Assessment in Counseling Procedures and Practices, 6th Edition
  248. Augmentative and Alternative Communication - Supporting Children and Adults with Complex Communication Needs 4th Edition
  249. ASTRO 3: Introductory Astronomy
  250. A Short Course in Photography: Digital 3rd Edition
  251. Advanced Accounting 13th Edition by Joe Ben Hoyle
  252. Abnormal Psychology, 10th Edition by Ronald J. Comer
  253. A modern epidemic: expert perspectives on obesity and diabetes - Amanda Sainsbury
  254. Automotive Vehicle Fire Analysis
  255. A Job to Love - The School of Life
  256. American Heathens: religion, race, and reconstruction in California – Joshua
  257. Applied Information Security: A Hands-on Guide to Information Security Software 2nd Edition
  258. Advanced Practice Nursing in the Care of Older Adults
  259. A+ Guide to Software 9th Edition
  260. Anatomy & Physiology: The Unity of Form and Function 7th Edition
  261. Acupuncture and Moxibustion - A Clinical Desk Reference
  262. A Visual Guide to Stata Graphics 3rd Edition
  263. A History of Modern Psychology, 4th Edition
  264. A New Reference Grammar of Mode 5th Edition
  265. Aphrodisiacs: The Science and the Myth - Taberner, Peter V.
  266. Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nursing, 2nd Edition
  267. A History of the World’s Religions 13th Edition
  268. A key to Whiteheads Process and reality
  269. Abnormal Psychology 17th Edition by James N. Butcher
  270. Aristophanes: Women at the Thesmophoria. Frogs
  271. Alcohol, Other Drugs, and Behavior: Psychological Research Perspectives 2nd Edition
  272. Applied Mechanics with solidworks by Godfrey Onwubolu
  273. An Introduction to MultiAgent Systems 2E
  274. ACSM's Exercise Management for Persons with Chronic Disease and Disabilities 4th Edition
  275. Art History Volume II 6th Edition
  276. Applied Survey Sampling
  277. A Process Theory of Organization
  278. A Practical Guide to Contemporary Pharmacy Practice and Compounding 4th Edition
  279. Anglicizing America
  280. Ability Profiling and School Failure - One Chid's Struggle to be Seen as Competent 2nd Edition
  281. Art: A Brief History 6th Edition
  282. A Critical Approach to Human Growth and Development
  283. An Introduction to Intercultural Communication: Identities in a Global Community 9th Edition
  284. An Introduction to Policing 8th Edition
  285. American Government and Politics Today 2017-2018 Edition
  286. Adolescence 10th Edition
  287. Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood: A Cultural Approach 6th Edition
  288. ATI TEAS Secrets Study Guide 6th Edition
  289. An Introduction to Behavioral Endocrinology, 5th Edition
  290. Atkinson and Hilgard’s Introduction to Psychology
  291. Art Law : A concise guide for artists, curators and art educators by Micheal E. Jones 2016 edition
  292. America, Past and Present Volume 1 10th Edition
  293. A Dictionary of Zoology
  294. A Topical Approach to Lifespan Development 8th Edition
  295. A Journey Around Our America
  296. Adaptable Interventions for Counseling Concerns - A step-by-step Clinical Workbook
submitted by TailExpert to CollegeTextbook [link] [comments]

Running Two GPUs- This is a tricky one.

Hello!
I'm trying to get a (remarkably unorthodox) multi-GPU setup working with my system. In short, I'm trying to pair an Nvidia GTX 1050ti and a Quadra FX580 on the same Windows 10 system. My motherboard is a Gigabyte GA-A320M-S2H.
The 1050ti is installed in the PCiE x16 slot, and the Quadro FX580 is installed in one of the PCiE 1x slots via a 1x -> 16x riser card(typically used by bitcoin miners). Windows 10 recognizes both devices in the device manager. Yes, I understand the bottlenecks, warnings, and otherwise ridiculous nature of this setup, but I just needs it for additional monitor outputs. Buying a completely new 10-series GPU or new motherboard is out of the budget(already had the Quadro FX580 on hand), and USB-based video cards are too unreliable and underperforming for what we're after. This is what we've tried so far and the results we've gotten:
Here's where things get interesting.
Booting into Linux, both GPUs work with no issues, right off the bat.
Booting into Windows 10 safe mode and running DDU (followed by a reboot back into safe mode) enables both GPUs, and they both work. Which suggests that Windows 10 is definitely capable of operating in this configuration. However, attempting to install either driver for either card (or even just letting Windows do so on its own) breaks the FX580 and enables only the 1050 ti, giving a "Code 43" for the FX580 in device manager.
I'm completely perplexed. Drivers for the FX580 aren't important, as it's just for additional screen real estate, though being able to run the latest drivers for the 1050ti would be nice for best game performance. Is there a way to "lock" the working Microsoft Basics Display Driver to the FX580, keeping it in a working state and allowing the 1050ti to be updated? My friend did this successfully with his personal system with a 1080ti and an old ATI card and it was plug-and-play; both cards worked great and there were no driver issues, so I'm completely stumped as to why this configuration is giving me so much trouble(He is stumped on this problem as well)
Any insight or help would be greatly appreciated!
submitted by tuckjohn37 to techsupport [link] [comments]

Switched from a 1050 GT to a 5700 XT, it's great!

Edit: Resubmitted, original post removed due to lack of flair.
After 11 years I returned to an AMD GPU. I bought a Sapphire Pulse Radeon 5700 XT about three weeks ago once the non-blower cards weren't selling out in minutes. Price at the time was $409.99.
https://ibb.co/J7DvnYr
Some initial thoughts:
I didn't realize the power draw at idle would be so low (using Global Wattman) at 9W. I didn't know that the dual fans would actually shut off at low usage and make the card silent. It's much quieter than my old card, an EVGA 1050 Gaming, but I assume that's because it's fan is much smaller. I haven't stressed the card too much, but at least I now have something I can push for the next few years. I can't wait to get a 4k monitor and see what the card can really do.
I decided to do a look back on my previous video cards:
ATI 9800PRO All In Wonder (January 2005) - $245 - To pair with my NEC 19 inch CRT monitor. I could record TV on my computer, which I thought was amazing at the time (also coincidentally a month before YouTube was founded).
EVGA GeForce 8800GTS (G92) (April 2008) - $280 - Much quicker than the 9800PRO, used it for a very long time, but it was really slow towards the end.
EVGA 1050 Gaming (November 2017) - $105 - I got this in the middle of the bitcoin mining crisis when every card was at or over MSRP. I thought this would just be a filler card until prices came down, but that turned into about 2 years. Worked ok, but some newer games were a struggle.
I do have one question. Now that I have a video card that can support 4k, do you have any suggestions on monitors? I'm currently running dual Acer monitors (24 and 21 inches), but I was thinking of dual 27 inch 4k monitors. Can the 5700 XT handle this? I'm not sure if I absolutely have to have FreeSync, and in the past I've liked Dell's monitors (currently looking at the U2718Q). Thanks!
submitted by 3blue to Amd [link] [comments]

Multi GPU setup

Multi GPU setup submitted by drakger to techsupportgore [link] [comments]

Largest Video Card Boom in History?

Shortly after Ethereum had a surge, the demand for video cards skyrocketed.
I am trying to figure out historically when the greatest rush for video cards occurred. Was it in May, 2017 or January, 2018?
Were there any other times in history where there was a major buy-rush for GPU’s?
submitted by adamharold to EtherMining [link] [comments]

Incredibly shiny ATI 7970's

submitted by MechaSnacks to hardware [link] [comments]

Crypto Mining for Beginners. Is it really worth it?

Crypto Mining for Beginners. Is it really worth it?

Image from blokt.com
Mining cryptocoins is an arms race that rewards early adopters. You might have heard of Bitcoin, the first decentralized cryptocurrency that was released in early 2009. Similar digital currencies have crept into the worldwide market since then, including a spin-off from Bitcoin called Bitcoin Cash. You can get in on the cryptocurrency rush if you take the time to learn the basics properly.

Which Alt-Coins Should Be Mined?


Image from btcwarp.com
If you had started mining Bitcoins back in 2009, you could have earned thousands of dollars by now. At the same time, there are plenty of ways you could have lost money, too. Bitcoins are not a good choice for beginning miners who work on a small scale. The current up-front investment and maintenance costs, not to mention the sheer mathematical difficulty of the process, just doesn't make it profitable for consumer-level hardware. Now, Bitcoin mining is reserved for large-scale operations only.
Litecoins, Dogecoins, and Feathercoins, on the other hand, are three Scrypt-based cryptocurrencies that are the best cost-benefit for beginners.
Dogecoins and Feathercoins would yield slightly less profit with the same mining hardware but are becoming more popular daily. Peercoins, too, can also be a reasonably decent return on your investment of time and energy.
As more people join the cryptocoin rush, your choice could get more difficult to mine because more expensive hardware will be required to discover coins. You will be forced to either invest heavily if you want to stay mining that coin, or you will want to take your earnings and switch to an easier cryptocoin. Understanding the top 3 bitcoin mining methods is probably where you need to begin; this article focuses on mining "scrypt" coins.
Also, be sure you are in a country where bitcoins and bitcoin mining is legal.

Is It Worth It to Mine Cryptocoins?

As a hobby venture, yes, cryptocoin mining can generate a small income of perhaps a dollar or two per day. In particular, the digital currencies mentioned above are very accessible for regular people to mine, and a person can recoup $1000 in hardware costs in about 18-24 months.
As a second income, no, cryptocoin mining is not a reliable way to make substantial money for most people. The profit from mining cryptocoins only becomes significant when someone is willing to invest $3000-$5000 in up-front hardware costs, at which time you could potentially earn $50 per day or more.

Set Reosonable Expectations

If your objective is to earn substantial money as a second income, then you are better off purchasing cryptocoins with cash instead of mining them, and then tucking them away in the hopes that they will jump in value like gold or silver bullion. If your objective is to make a few digital bucks and spend them somehow, then you just might have a slow way to do that with mining.
Smart miners need to keep electricity costs to under $0.11 per kilowatt-hour; mining with 4 GPU video cards can net you around $8.00 to $10.00 per day (depending upon the cryptocurrency you choose), or around $250-$300 per month.
The two catches are:
1) The up-front investment in purchasing 4 ASIC processors or 4 AMD Radeon graphic processing units
2) The market value of cryptocoins
Now, there is a small chance that your chosen digital currency will jump in value alongside Bitcoin at some point. Then, possibly, you could find yourself sitting on thousands of dollars in cryptocoins. The emphasis here is on "small chance," with small meaning "slightly better than winning the lottery."
If you do decide to try cryptocoin mining, definitely do so as a hobby with a very small income return. Think of it as "gathering gold dust" instead of collecting actual gold nuggets. And always, always, do your research to avoid a scam currency.

How Cryptocoin Mining Works

Let's focus on mining scrypt coins, namely Litecoins, Dogecoins, or Feathercoins. The whole focus of mining is to accomplish three things:
- Provide bookkeeping services to the coin network. Mining is essentially 24/7 computer accounting called "verifying transactions."
- Get paid a small reward for your accounting services by receiving fractions of coins every couple of days.
- Keep your personal costs down, including electricity and hardware.

The Laundry List: What You Will Need to Mine Cryptocoins


https://preview.redd.it/gx65tcz0ncg31.jpg?width=1280&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=f99b79d0ff96fe7d529dc20d52964b46306fb070
You will need ten things to mine Litecoins, Dogecoins, and/or Feathercoins.
1) A free private database called a coin wallet. This is a password-protected container that stores your earnings and keeps a network-wide ledger of transactions.
2) A free mining software package, like this one from AMD, typically made up of cgminer and stratum.
3) A membership in an online mining pool, which is a community of miners who combine their computers to increase profitability and income stability.
4) Membership at an online currency exchange, where you can exchange your virtual coins for conventional cash, and vice versa.
5) A reliable full-time internet connection, ideally 2 megabits per second or faster speed.
6) A hardware setup location in your basement or other cool and air-conditioned space.
7) A desktop or custom-built computer designed for mining. Yes, you may use your current computer to start, but you won't be able to use the computer while the miner is running. A separate dedicated computer is ideal. Do not use a laptop, gaming console or handheld device to mine. These devices just are not effective enough to generate income.
8) An ATI graphics processing unit (GPU) or a specialized processing device called a mining ASIC chip. The cost will be anywhere from $90 used to $3000 new for each GPU or ASIC chip. The GPU or ASIC will be the workhorse of providing the accounting services and mining work.
10) A house fan to blow cool air across your mining computer. Mining generates substantial heat, and cooling the hardware is critical for your success.
11) You absolutely need a strong appetite of personal curiosity for reading and constant learning, as there are ongoing technology changes and new techniques for optimizing coin mining results. The most successful coin miners spend hours every week studying the best ways to adjust and improve their coin mining performance.

Original Blog Post: https://www.lifewire.com/cryptocoin-mining-for-beginners-2483064
submitted by Tokenberry to NewbieZone [link] [comments]

NVIDIA Geforce GTX 280 support question.

Here is a link to the card in question:
http://imgur.com/gallery/5DikS15
I built a PC specifically for mining bitcoin with nicehash, it has an AMD phenom II processor and an ATI Radeon graphics card, but it also has an NVIDIA Geforce GTX 280, and I was wondering if the GTX 280 is supported by nicehash. If it isn't, can there be a version that can be released that supports the GPU in question? Thanks!
UPDATE: I said in this post that I have an NVIDIA Geforce GTX 280. NOT an AMD video card or anything like that (that I plan on mining with). So PLEASE STOP ASKING! Also the point of this thread was to ask if it was compatible. I don't care if the card isn't profitable anymore. I just want to know if it is compatible. I did not know that there was so much unneeded controversy over a person just wanting to bitcoin mine with older hardware. Please stop commenting about it not being profitable anymore. That's all. Have a nice day.

submitted by Killerpokemon11 to NiceHash [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mining rigs: fire AND electical hazards!

Bitcoin mining rigs: fire AND electical hazards! submitted by kmeisthax to shittybattlestations [link] [comments]

So I finally gave Honeyminer a try. (my personal semi-review)

This review was last updated 11-30-18
When I first was interested in trying this program I couldn't find anything about it. it seems a lot of people were too scared to try it since their is like no information about it other then from the web page itself. to be honest I was a bit scared to try it. I've tried many other software of this kind, on a "test" machine I'm not afraid to lose on a secondary network and router... incase its a scam or gonna give me a virus and I suggest anyone installing mining software do the same as a rule of thumb. please keep in mind the software is still relatively new and they are working to improve it still. They seem to be hiring as well if your interested in helping them grow by working for them look near the bottom for their contact e-mail. ____________________________________________________________________________________________________
This review is for the windows version of Honyminer Because its still relatively new I knew could go one of two ways "sacm software" like most every mobile mining app or even quite a few desktop ones - Or legit. I'm glad to say after using it for a month it seems legit. I was able to withdraw from it no problem. If your system is really crappy It might not work that well on your computer or mining rig. There are no ads and the program doesn't seem to disrupt any day to day activity at least not on my main system, however you can of course expect increased heat production of your system as with any mining software, adequate cooling is important in mining. Anyways Honyminer is as close to an easy one click mining software as I have come. they seem to be making a "pro" version too for more hardcore miners. They do take a fee which is to be expected *look near the bottom for fee information\* but that fee goes down significantly if you have multiple GPU's mining.. The good thing about it for me was it let me kind of set my rig to "autopilot" so to speak. If you wish to see the H/s numbers in real time, go to you settings and view the "expert logs" which will also tell what coin is being mined at the time ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Pros
Pro and or con (depending on how you look at it)
Cons:
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
COMPATIBILITY: (sorry it keeps adding asterisks to the card model for no reason)
WORKED ON: every nvidia card tested so far with card models dating back from 20014 to now..
Worked on some surprising low end and or old CPU and GPUs. like the
AMD Radeon R9 380 card in addition to a AMD Athlon II X3 450 Processor and it mines just fine.. of course that processor doesn't make much on its own lol.. but thats an extra 2 or 3 cents per day by itself. I've also tested it with an i3, i2 Most AMD cards worked but I ran into issues with a few so maybe it's easier for me to just tell you what did not work.
DID NOT WORK ON:
--- any of the AMD ATI Radeon HD 4250's tested so far (2) that particular card It didn't work at all for mining like never enabled the gpu but the cpu on that machine did work however it would generate an "error" on start up but otherwise did not disrupt the mining on that system except if I turned on idle earning mode, I would get a bunch of errors as it was trying to access the GPU. we need the functionality to enable or disable hardware individually I think. (errors or no errors it just seems like a good thing to have.)
OR a system that had both a AMD Radeon R7 Graphics and a AMD A8-7650K Radeon R7, (4C+6G) which surprised me considering some of the things that did work lol... but I think it might just might be that one system, but either way can't vouch that it will work. That system was pre-built and wont allow the parts to be changed or easily removed to be worth the effort since I have to use it for other things so unfortunately I can't test these on another mainboard at least not with wasting some time, money and patients that Id rather dedicate elsewhere for now.
I had some issues using one RX Vega 56 card but i think it's was just that card because another one did work just fine.________________________________________________________________________
FEES W/ comparison to nicehash
I'm not sure if this post will be helpful to anyone looking into this software or anyone whos looking to try a different mining software but if it dose great.
-- nicehash charges the following fees as far as "selling/mining" or withdrawing.
Payouts for balances less than 0.1 to external wallet 5%
Payouts for balances greater than or equal to 0.1 BTC to external wallet 3%
Payouts for balances greater than or equal to 0.001 BTC to NiceHash wallet 2%
Withdrawal fees from NiceHash wallet
Withdrawals from NiceHash wallet are subjected to the withdrawal fee, which depends on the withdrawn amount and withdrawal option.
WITHDRAWAL OPTION AMOUNT TO WITHDRAW FEE Any BTC wallet From 0.002 (min) to 0.05 BTC 0.0001 BTC
Any BTC wallet More than 0.05 BTC 0.2% of withdrawn amount
Coinbase More than 0.001 BTC FREE - No fee. but they also say Minimum Coinbase withdrawal limit is adjusted dynamically according to the API overload._____________________________________________________________________________
honyminer fees are based on number of GPU's working.
8% for 1 GPU or for 2 GPUs or more the fee is 2.5%.
The only withdrawal fee is the standard BTC transaction fee that bitcoin charges and it doesn't go to honyminer. When they add the other withdrawal functions that fee cam be avoided I suppose.
_________________________
Earnings: in comparison to nicehash
Update: sometimes software / test networks will give a view that can be off + or - a few percent compared to actual. A lot of different things can affect your earnings including where you are located in the world, I'm not sure how many of you uses more than one mining software day to day , ISP issues, crypto price fluctuation, updates to fee's, and inaccuracies in test software/networks can affect results. but I go back and forth between different ones from time to time and I think that's good practice to keep options open. I notice that honey miner seems to do better for me at night-time and early morning/afternoon is when it has the most trouble raking in the crypto's
That said I've been trying to test to see how this compares to nice hash earnings, with two of my buddies. So this is an average between the 3 of our profits vs loss compared to nice hash, I'm using a two 10 GPU/ 3 cpu setups, while one of my buddies is using two 1 gpu, 2 cpu setups and the other is using two 30 gpu mini farm's. We each have 2 networks each located relatively close by *less than .5 mile the furthest one* one with honyminer running and the other with nice hash and we are looking over 24 hour periods When all three of us have the results for one day, we average our results together. In all we will be looking over a 14 day period. UPDATE: the results below were done well long before the latest update to the software so I do not know if they have changed, Id have to do another round or perhaps some from the community could give me their results and save me a bit of work. I'm not sure when Id have the time to dig into it again. Sorry that it took me so long before I could get on here to post the results of the last few days of the tests.
Seem to be a bit smaller then nicehash at times and higher at other times. it seems to for me at least payquicker and it gets deposited in my nicehash account sooner than I expected.
hopefully when they let up pick which coin to mine on our own it may help somewhat, and any of you who want to move smaller volume will probably benefit when they add the functionality to withdraw other coin/usd.
anyways when their autopilot system works it works great but when it doesn't it's just "okay" for lack of a better word...
_____________________________________________________
Contact: they have a contact us part on their webpage and they also have a reddit page which I was made aware of from contacting them https://www.reddit.com/HoneyMine
Careers: If anyone is interested in working for them the job listings at the time of this typing were for Senior Java Developer(s) and Customer Service Representative(s) the email listed is [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]). id suggest you check their site for the requirements I just added this part to the review as a courtesy if anyone's interested its not meant to be a focus of it. But I know we have some really talented people on reddit who care about the crypto world passionately so id rather give honyminer a chance to have some of those sort on their team since it might help improve the software faster for the end users.. if that makes sense.
_________________________________________________________
UPDATE: If a question reminds me I left out something I think should have mentioned Ill try to add it here so ppl don't have to scroll all over the place.. I don't write many reviews (for anything) so I don't know if this one was any good or not but I hope it was okay.. and I'm still a new reddit user relatively. I just wanted to make this review mainly because there is next to no information on honyminer when I looked for it and maybe it can help anyone whos interested in it.
browolf2 asked Is it basically like nicehash then? :
A: In a way, its like nice hash that its cloud based, but you get paid not just when your pool completes an order. there are no "buyers" only "sellers" if you look at it that way...I hope I'm wording this the right way.. It's just straight up mining and they take their fee but compared to nicehash the fees for "mining" are different
karl0525 asked: do you know if we can contact the honeyminer dev team and see if they will communicate here on Reddit. Might give them some good ideas what us miners are looking for? Worth a try maybe? Thanks:
A: I submitted a question to their "contact us" part of their webpage and I got a reply from them, this is the message I received below:
Thank you for writing in and for your interest in Honeyminer. We always welcome feedback and suggestions from our users. We are currently planning on expanding our online and social media presence.
Please check our our Reddit page: https://www.reddit.com/HoneyMine
submitted by Joe_Cow to gpumining [link] [comments]

Got a new test server at work. Here's what 4096 CUDA cores looks like!

submitted by nil00 to buildapc [link] [comments]

Password cracking, mining, and GPUs

submitted by nepcoder to netsec [link] [comments]

Explain.... PLEASE tell me what mobo is being used here.

submitted by Throwaway_4_opinions to buildapc [link] [comments]

Wow

Initiative Q is an attempt by ex-PayPal guys to create a new payment system instead of payment cards that were designed in the 1950s. The system uses its own currency, the Q, and to get people to start using the system once it's ready they are allocating Qs for free to people that sign up now (the amount drops as more people join - so better to join early). Signing up is free and they only ask for your name and an email address. There's nothing to lose but if this payment system becomes a world leading payment method your Qs can be worth a lot. If you missed getting bitcoin seven years ago, you wouldn't want to miss this.
Here is my invite link: https://initiativeq.com/invite/J_vATyG2X
This link will stop working once I’m out of invites. Let me know after you registered, because I need to verify you on my end.
submitted by Stive_patrizi to u/Stive_patrizi [link] [comments]

such beginner shibe thread wow how to get coin

 how to shibecoin v rich in minutes much instruct so simple any doge can do 

START HERE

UPDATE 1/21/14: I'm not updating this guide anymore. Most of the steps should still work though. See the wiki or check the sidebar for updated instructions.
Before you do anything else, you need to get a wallet. Until there's a secure online wallet, this means you need to download the dogecoin client.
Now open the client you just downloaded. You'll be given a default address automatically, and it should connect to peers and start downloading the dogechain (aka blockchain in formal speak). You'll know because there will be a progress bar at the bottom and at the lower right there should be a signal strength icon (TODO: add screenshots).
If you've waited 2 or 3 minutes and nothing is happening, copy this:
maxconnections=100 addnode=95.85.29.144 addnode=162.243.113.110 addnode=146.185.181.114 addnode=188.165.19.28 addnode=166.78.155.36 addnode=doge.scryptpools.com addnode=doge.netcodepool.org addnode=doge.pool.webxass.de addnode=doge.cryptopool.it addnode=pool.testserverino.de addnode=doge.luckyminers.com addnode=doge.cryptovalley.com addnode=miner.coinedup.comdoge addnode=doge.cryptoculture.net addnode=dogepool.pw addnode=doge.gentoomen.org addnode=doge.cryptominer.net addnode=67.205.20.10 addnode=162.243.113.110 addnode=78.46.57.132 
And paste it into a new text file called dogecoin.conf, which you then place into the dogecoin app directory.
Now restart your qt client and the blockchain should start downloading in about 1-2 minutes.
Once it finished downloading, you're ready to send and receive Dogecoins!

GETTING COINS

Decide how you want to get Dogecoin. Your options are:
I'll go into detail about each of these. I'm currently writing this out. I'll make edits as I add sections. Suggestions are welcome.

MINING

Mining is how new dogecoins are created. If you're new to crypto currencies, read this. To mine (also called "digging"), a computer with a decent GPU (graphics card) is recommended. You can also mine with your CPU, but it's not as efficient.

GPU MINING

These instructions cover only Windows for now. To mine, you'll need to figure out what GPU you have. It'll be either AMD/ATI or Nvidia. The setup for both is approximately the same.

Step One: Choose a pool

There's a list of pools on the wiki. For now it doesn't really matter which one you choose. You can easily switch later.
NOTE: You can mine in two ways. Solo mining is where you mine by yourself. When you find a block you get all the reward. Pool mining is when you team up with other miners to work on the same block together. This makes it more likely that you'll find a block, but you won't get all of it, you'll have to split it up with others according to your share of the work. Pool mining is recommended because it gives you frequent payouts, because you find more blocks. The larger the pool you join, the more frequent the payouts, but the smaller the reward you get.
Over a long period of time the difference between pool and solo mining goes away, but if you solo mine it might be months before you get any coins.

Step two: Set up pool account

The pool you chose should have a getting started page. Read it and follow the instructions. Instructions vary but the general idea is:
When you're done with this, you'll need to know:

Step three: Download mining software

For best performance you'll need the right mining software.
Unzip the download anywhere you want.

Step four: Set up miner

Create a text file in the same folder as your miner application. Inside, put the command you'll be running (remove brackets).
For AMD it's cgminer.exe --scrypt -o stratum+tcp://: -u -p
For Nvidia it's cudaminer.exe -o stratum+tcp://: -O :
Substitute the right stuff in for the placeholders. Then on the next line of the text file type pause. This will let you see any errors that you get. Then save the file with any name you want, as long as the file extension is .bat. For example mine_serverName.bat.

Step five: Launch your miner

Just open the .bat file and a command line window should pop up, letting you know that the miner is starting. Once it starts, it should print out your hash rate.
If you now go to the pool website, the dashboard should start showing your hashrate. At first it'll be lower than what it says in the miner, but that's because the dashboard is taking a 5 minute average. It'll catch up soon enough.
NOTE: A normal hashrate is between 50 Kh/s up to even 1 Mh/s depending on your GPU.

You're now mining Dogecoins

That's it, nothing more to it.

CPU MINING

CPU mining isn't really recommended, because you'll be spending a lot on more on power than you'd make from mining Dogecoin. You could better spend that money on buying Dogecoin by trading. But if you have free electricity and want to try it out, check out this informative forum post.

Trading

Trading has been difficult so far, but Dogecoin just got added to a few new exchanges. If you don't have a giant mining rig, this is probably the best way to get 100k or more dogecoins at the moment. I'll write up a more complete guide, but for now check out these sites:

Faucets

Faucets are sites that give out free coins. Usually a site will give out somewhere between 1 and 100 Dogecoin. Every site has its own time limits, but usually you can only receive coins once every few hours, or in some cases, days. It's a great way to get started. All you do is copy your address from the receive section of your wallet and enter it on some faucet sites. Check out /dogecoinfaucets for more. If you go to each site on there you might end up with a couple hundred Dogecoin!

Begging

This method is pretty straightforward. Post your receiving address, and ask for some coins. Such poor shibe. The only catch is, don't do it here! Please go to /dogecoinbeg.

Tips

At the moment there are two tip bots:
Other redditors can give you Dogecoin by summoning the tip bot, something like this:
+dogetipbot 5 doge
This might happen if you make a good post, or someone just wants to give out some coins. Once you receive a tip you have to accept it in a few days or else it'll get returned. Do this by following the instructions on the message you receive in your inbox. You reply to the bot with "+accept". Commands go in the message body. Once you do that, the bot will create a tipping address for you, and you can use the links in the message you receive to see your info, withdraw coins to your dogecoin-qt wallet, see your history, and a bunch of other stuff.
As a bonus, so_doge_tip has a feature where you can get some Dogecoins to start with in exchange for how much karma you have. To do this, send the message "+redeem DOGE" to so_doge_tip. You'll need to create a tipping account if you don't have one.
If you want to create a tipping account without ever being tipped first, message either of the bots with "+register" and an address will be created for you.

CHANGELOG

  • 1/21/14 - Added note about this thread no longer being updated
  • 1/21/14 - Changed wallet links to official site
  • 12/27/13 - Added 1.3 wallet-qt links
  • 12/21/13 - Added new windows 1.2 wallet link
  • 12/20/13 - Fixed +redeem text
  • 12/18/13 - Added short blurb on trading.
  • 12/18/13 - Updated cudaminer to new version (cudaminer-2013-12-18.zip).
  • 12/18/13 - Fixed +redeem link
  • 12/18/13 - Updates dogecoin.conf, from here.
  • 12/17/13 - Linked to mining explanation.
  • 12/17/13 - Added link to CPU mining tutorial, in response to this.
  • 12/16/13 - Added links to tip commands, link to dogetipbot wiki.
  • 12/16/13 - Note about tip commands going in body, in response to this.
  • 12/16/13 - Added link to cgminer mirror, thanks to scubasteve812 and thanks to Bagrisham.
  • 12/16/13 - Note about removing brackets in response to this.
  • 12/15/13 - Fixed hash rate as per this comment, thanks lleti
  • 12/15/13 - Added info for all other ways of getting money, except for trading (placeholder for now)
  • 12/15/13 - Added windows GPU mining instructions 12/15/13 - Added wallet instructions, list of how to get money
submitted by lego-banana to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Console gaming is hardly different from PC gaming, and much of what people say about PC gaming to put it above console gaming is often wrong.

I’m not sure about you, but for the past few years, I’ve been hearing people go on and on about PCs "superiority" to the console market. People cite various reasons why they believe gaming on a PC is “objectively” better than console gaming, often for reasons related to power, costs, ease-of-use, and freedom.
…Only problem: much of what they say is wrong.
There are many misconceptions being thrown about PC gaming vs Console gaming, that I believe need to be addressed. This isn’t about “PC gamers being wrong,” or “consoles being the best,” absolutely not. I just want to cut through some of the stuff people use to put down console gaming, and show that console gaming is incredibly similar to PC gaming. I mean, yes, this is someone who mainly games on console, but I also am getting a new PC that I will game on as well, not to mention the 30 PC games I already own and play. I’m not particularly partial to one over the other.
Now I will mainly be focusing on the PlayStation side of the consoles, because I know it best, but much of what I say will apply to Xbox as well. Just because I don’t point out many specific Xbox examples, doesn’t mean that they aren’t out there.

“PCs can use TVs and monitors.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is the implication of one, and overall just… confusing. This is in some articles and the pcmasterrace “why choose a PC” section, where they’re practically implying that consoles can’t do this. I mean, yes, as long as the ports of your PC match up with your screen(s) inputs, you could plug a PC into either… but you could do the same with a console, again, as long as the ports match up.
I’m guessing the idea here is that gaming monitors often use Displayport, as do most dedicated GPUs, and consoles are generally restricted to HDMI… But even so, monitors often have HDMI ports. In fact, PC Magazine has just released their list of the best gaming monitors of 2017, and every single one of them has an HDMI port. A PS4 can be plugged into these just as easily as a GTX 1080.
I mean, even if the monitoTV doesn’t have HDMI or AV to connect with your console, just use an adaptor. If you have a PC with ports that doesn’t match your monitoTV… use an adapter. I don’t know what the point of this argument is, but it’s made a worrying amount of times.

“On PC, you have a wide range of controller options, but on console you’re stuck with the standard controller."

Are you on PlayStation and wish you could use a specific type of controller that suits your favorite kind of gameplay? Despite what some may believe, you have just as many options as PC.
Want to play fighting games with a classic arcade-style board, featuring the buttons and joystick? Here you go!
Want to get serious about racing and get something more accurate and immersive than a controller? Got you covered.
Absolutely crazy about flying games and, like the racers, want something better than a controller? Enjoy!
Want Wii-style motion controls? Been around since the PS3. If you prefer the form factor of the Xbox One controller but you own a PS4, Hori’s got you covered. And of course, if keyboard and mouse it what keeps you on PC, there’s a PlayStation compatible solution for that. Want to use the keyboard and mouse that you already own? Where there’s a will, there’s a way.
Of course, these aren’t isolated examples, there are plenty of options for each of these kind of controllers. You don’t have to be on PC to enjoy alternate controllers.

“On PC you could use Steam Link to play anywhere in your house and share games with others.”

PS4 Remote play app on PC/Mac, PSTV, and PS Vita.
PS Family Sharing.
Using the same PSN account on multiple PS4s/Xbox Ones and PS3s/360s, or using multiple accounts on the same console.
In fact, if multiple users are on the same PS4, only one has to buy the game for both users to play it on that one PS4. On top of that, only one of them has to have PS Plus for both to play online (if the one with PS Plus registers the PS4 as their main system).
PS4 Share Play; if two people on separate PS4s want to play a game together that only one of them owns, they can join a Party and the owner of the game can have their friend play with them in the game.
Need I say more?

“Gaming is more expensive on console.”

Part one, the Software
This is one that I find… genuinely surprising. There’s been a few times I’ve mentioned that part of the reason I chose a PS4 is for budget gaming, only to told that “games are cheaper on Steam.” To be fair, there are a few games on PSN/XBL that are more expensive than they are on Steam, so I can see how someone could believe this… but apparently they forgot about disks.
Dirt Rally, a hardcore racing sim game that’s… still $60 on all 3 platforms digitally… even though its successor is out.
So does this mean you have to pay full retail for this racing experience? Nope, because disk prices.
Just Cause 3, an insane open-world experience that could essentially be summed up as “break stuff, screw physics.” And it’s a good example of where the Steam price is lower than PSN and XBL:
Not by much, but still cheaper on Steam, so cheaper on PC… Until you look at the disk prices.
See my point? Often times the game is cheaper on console because of the disk alternative that’s available for practically every console-available game. Even when the game is brand new.
Dirt 4 - Remember that Dirt Rally successor I mentioned?
Yes, you could either buy this relatively new game digitally for $60, or just pick up the disk for a discounted price. And again, this is for a game that came out 2 months ago, and even it’s predecessor’s digital cost is locked at $60. Of course, I’m not going to ignore the fact that Dirt 4 is currently (as of writing this) discounted on Steam, but on PSN it also happens to be discounted for about the same amount.
Part 2: the Subscription
Now… let’s not ignore the elephant in the room: PS Plus and Xbox Gold. Now these would be ignorable, if they weren’t required for online play (on the PlayStation side, it’s only required for PS4, but still). So yes, it’s still something that will be included in the cost of your PS4 or Xbox One/360, assuming you play online. Bummer, right?
Here’s the thing, although that’s the case, although you have to factor in this $60 cost with your console, you can make it balance out, at worst, and make it work out for you as a budget gamer, at best. As nice as it would be to not have to deal with the price if you don’t want to, it’s not like it’s a problem if you use it correctly.
Imagine going to a new restaurant. This restaurant has some meals that you can’t get anywhere else, and fair prices compared to competitors. Only problem: you have to pay a membership fee to have the sides. Now you can have the main course, sit down and enjoy your steak or pasta, but if you want to have a side to have a full meal, you have to pay an annual fee.
Sounds shitty, right? But here’s the thing: not only does this membership allow you to have sides with your meal, but it also allows you to eat two meals for free every month, and also gives you exclusive discounts for other meals, drinks, and desserts.
Let’s look at PS Plus for a minute: for $60 per year, you get:
  • 2 free PS4 games, every month
  • 2 free PS3 games, every month
  • 1 PS4/PS3 and Vita compatible game, and 1 Vita-only game, every month
  • Exclusive/Extended discounts, especially during the weekly/seasonal sales (though you don’t need PS Plus to get sales, PS Plus members get to enjoy the best sales)
  • access to online multiplayer
So yes, you’re paying extra because of that membership, but what you get with that deal pays for it and then some. In fact, let’s ignore the discounts for a minute: you get 24 free PS4 games, 24 free PS3 games, and 12 Vita only + 12 Vita compatible games, up to 72 free games every year. Even if you only one of these consoles, that’s still 24 free games a year. Sure, maybe you get games for the month that you don’t like, then just wait until next month.
In fact, let’s look at Just Cause 3 again. It was free for PS Plus members in August, which is a pretty big deal. Why is this significant? Because it’s, again, a $60 digital game. That means with this one download, you’ve balanced out your $60 annual fee. Meaning? Every free game after that is money saved, every discount after that is money saved. And this is a trend: every year, PS Plus will release a game that balances out the entire service cost, then another 23 more that will only add icing to that budget cake. Though, you could just count games as paying off PS Plus until you hit $60 in savings, but still.
All in all, PS Plus, and Xbox Gold which offers similar options, saves you money. On top of that, again, you don't need to have these to get discounts, but with these memberships, you get more discounts.
Now, I’ve seen a few Steam games go up for free for a week, but what about being free for an entire month? Not to mention that; even if you want to talk about Steam Summer Sales, what about the PSN summer sale, or again, disc sale discounts? Now a lot of research and math would be needed to see if every console gamer would save money compared to every Steam gamer for the same games, but at the very least? The costs will balance out, at worst.
Part 3, the Systems
  • Xbox and PS2: $299
  • Xbox 360 and PS3: $299 and $499, respectively
  • Xbox One and PS4: $499 and $399, respectively.
Rounded up a few dollars, that’s $1,000 - $1,300 in day-one consoles, just to keep up with the games! Crazy right? So called budget systems, such a rip-off.
Well, keep in mind that the generations here aren’t short.
The 6th generation, from the launch of the PS2 to the launch of the next generation consoles, lasted 5 years, 6 years based on the launch of the PS3 (though you could say it was 9 or 14, since the Xbox wasn’t discontinued until 2009, and the PS2 was supported all the way to 2014, a year after the PS4 was released). The 7th gen lasted 7 - 8 years, again depending on whether you count the launch of the Xbox 360 to PS3. The 8th gen so far has lasted 4 years. That’s 17 years that the console money is spread over. If you had a Netflix subscription for it’s original $8 monthly plan for that amount of time, that would be over $1,600 total.
And let’s be fair here, just like you could upgrade your PC hardware whenever you wanted, you didn’t have to get a console from launch. Let’s look at PlayStation again for example: In 2002, only two years after its release, the PS2 retail price was cut from $300 to $200. The PS3 Slim, released 3 years after the original, was $300, $100-$200 lower than the retail cost. The PS4? You could’ve either gotten the Uncharted bundle for $350, or one of the PS4 Slim bundles for $250. This all brings it down to $750 - $850, which again, is spread over a decade and a half. This isn’t even counting used consoles, sales, or the further price cuts that I didn’t mention.
Even if that still sounds like a lot of money to you, even if you’re laughing at the thought of buying new systems every several years, because your PC “is never obsolete,” tell me: how many parts have you changed out in your PC over the years? How many GPUs have you been through? CPUs? Motherboards? RAM sticks, monitors, keyboards, mice, CPU coolers, hard drives— that adds up. You don’t need to replace your entire system to spend a lot of money on hardware.
Even if you weren’t upgrading for the sake of upgrading, I’d be amazed if the hardware you’ve been pushing by gaming would last for about 1/3 of that 17 year period. Computer parts aren’t designed to last forever, and really won’t when you’re pushing them with intensive gaming for hours upon hours. Generally speaking, your components might last you 6-8 years, if you’ve got the high-end stuff. But let’s assume you bought a system 17 years ago that was a beast for it’s time, something so powerful, that even if it’s parts have degraded over time, it’s still going strong. Problem is: you will have to upgrade something eventually.
Even if you’ve managed to get this far into the gaming realm with the same 17 year old hardware, I’m betting you didn’t do it with a 17 year Operating System. How much did Windows 7 cost you? Or 8.1? Or 10? Oh, and don’t think you can skirt the cost by getting a pre-built system, the cost of Windows is embedded into the cost of the machine (why else would Microsoft allow their OS to go on so many machines).
Sure, Windows 10 was a free upgrade for a year, but that’s only half of it’s lifetime— You can’t get it for free now, and not for the past year. On top of that, the free period was an upgrade; you had to pay for 7 or 8 first anyway.
Point is, as much as one would like to say that they didn’t need to buy a new system every so often for the sake of gaming, that doesn’t mean they haven’t been paying for hardware, and even if they’ve only been PC gaming recently, you’ll be spending money on hardware soon enough.

“PC is leading the VR—“

Let me stop you right there.
If you add together the total number of Oculus Rifts and HTC Vives sold to this day, and threw in another 100,000 just for the sake of it, that number would still be under the number of PSVR headsets sold.
Why could this possibly be? Well, for a simple reason: affordability. The systems needed to run the PC headsets costs $800+, and the headsets are $500 - $600, when discounted. PSVR on the other hand costs $450 for the full bundle (headset, camera, and move controllers, with a demo disc thrown in), and can be played on either a $250 - $300 console, or a $400 console, the latter recommended. Even if you want to say that the Vive and Rift are more refined, a full PSVR set, system and all, could cost just over $100 more than a Vive headset alone.
If anything, PC isn’t leading the VR gaming market, the PS4 is. It’s the system bringing VR to the most consumers, showing them what the future of gaming could look like. Not to mention that as the PlayStation line grows more powerful (4.2 TFLOP PS4 Pro, 10 TFLOP “PS5…”), it won’t be long until the PlayStation line can use the same VR games as PC.
Either way, this shows that there is a console equivalent to the PC VR options. Sure, there are some games you'd only be able to play on PC, but there are also some games you'd only be able to play on PSVR.
…Though to be fair, if we’re talking about VR in general, these headsets don’t even hold a candle to, surprisingly, Gear VR.

“If it wasn’t for consoles holding devs back, then they would be able to make higher quality games.”

This one is based on the idea that because of how “low spec” consoles are, that when a developer has to take them in mind, then they can’t design the game to be nearly as good as it would be otherwise. I mean, have you ever seen the minimum specs for games on Steam?
GTA V
  • CPU: Intel Core 2 Quad CPU Q6600 @ 2.40GHz (4 CPUs) / AMD Phenom 9850 Quad-Core Processor (4 CPUs) @ 2.5GHz
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA 9800 GT 1GB / AMD HD 4870 1GB (DX 10, 10.1, 11)
Just Cause 3
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2500k, 3.3GHz / AMD Phenom II X6 1075T 3GHz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 670 (2GB) / AMD Radeon HD 7870 (2GB)
Fallout 4
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2300 2.8 GHz/AMD Phenom II X4 945 3.0 GHz or equivalent
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GTX 550 Ti 2GB/AMD Radeon HD 7870 2GB or equivalent
Overwatch
  • CPU: Intel Core i3 or AMD Phenom™ X3 8650
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 460, ATI Radeon™ HD 4850, or Intel® HD Graphics 4400
Witcher 3
  • Processor: Intel CPU Core i5-2500K 3.3GHz / AMD CPU Phenom II X4 940
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Nvidia GPU GeForce GTX 660 / AMD GPU Radeon HD 7870
Actually, bump up all the memory requirements to 8 GBs, and those are some decent specs, relatively speaking. And keep in mind these are the minimum specs to even open the games. It’s almost as if the devs didn’t worry about console specs when making a PC version of the game, because this version of the game isn’t on console. Or maybe even that the consoles aren’t holding the games back that much because they’re not that weak. Just a hypothesis.
But I mean, the devs are still ooobviously having to take weak consoles into mind right? They could make their games sooo much more powerful if they were PC only, right? Right?
No. Not even close.
iRacing
  • CPU: Intel Core i3, i5, i7 or better or AMD Bulldozer or better
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVidia GeForce 2xx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory / AMD 5xxx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory
Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds
  • CPU: Intel Core i3-4340 / AMD FX-6300
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • GPU: nVidia GeForce GTX 660 2GB / AMD Radeon HD 7850 2GB
These are PC only games. That’s right, no consoles to hold them back, they don’t have to worry about whether an Xbox One could handle it. Yet, they don’t require anything more than the Multiplatform games.
Subnautica
  • CPU: Intel Haswell 2 cores / 4 threads @ 2.5Ghz or equivalent
  • Memory: 4GB
  • GPU: Intel HD 4600 or equivalent - This includes most GPUs scoring greater than 950pts in the 3DMark Fire Strike benchmark
Rust
  • CPU: 2 ghz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • DirectX: Version 11 (they don’t even list a GPU)
So what’s the deal? Theoretically, if developers don’t have to worry about console specs, then why aren’t they going all-out and making games that no console could even dream of supporting?
Low-end PCs.
What, did you think people only game on Steam if they spent at least $500 on gaming hardware? Not all PC gamers have gaming-PC specs, and if devs close their games out to players who don’t have the strongest of PCs, then they’d be losing out on a pretty sizable chunk of their potential buyers.
Saying “devs having to deal with consoles is holding gaming back” is like saying “racing teams having to deal with Ford is holding GT racing back.” A: racing teams don’t have to deal with Ford if they don’t want to, which is probably why many of them don’t, and B: even though Ford doesn’t make the fastest cars overall, they still manage to make cars that are awesome on their own, they don’t even need to be compared to anything else to know that they make good cars.
I want to go back to that previous point though, developers having to deal with low-end PCs, because it’s integral to the next point:

“PCs are more powerful, gaming on PC provides a better experience.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is… misleading.
Did you know that according to the Steam Hardware & Software Survey (July 2017) , the percentage of Steam gamers who use a GPU that's less powerful than that of a PS4 Slim’s GPU is well over 50%? Things get dismal when compared to the PS4 Pro (Or Xbox One X). On top of that, the percentage of PC gamers who own a Nvidia 10 series card is about 20% (about 15% for the 1060, 1080 and 1070 owners).
Now to be fair, the large majority of gamers have CPUs with considerably high clock speeds, which is the main factor in CPU gaming performance. But, the number of Steam gamers with as much RAM or more than a PS4 or Xbox One is less than 50%, which can really bottleneck what those CPUs can handle.
These numbers are hardly better than they were in 2013, all things considered. Sure, a PS3/360 weeps in the face of even a $400 PC, but in this day in age, consoles have definitely caught up.
Sure, we could mention the fact that even 1% of Steam accounts represents over 1 million accounts, but that doesn’t really matter compared to the 10s of millions of 8th gen consoles sold; looking at it that way, sure the number of Nvidia 10 series owners is over 20 million, but that ignores the fact that there are over 5 times more 8th gen consoles sold than that.
Basically, even though PCs run on a spectrum, saying they're more powerful “on average” is actually wrong. Sure, they have the potential for being more powerful, but most of the time, people aren’t willing to pay the premium to reach those extra bits of performance.
Now why is this important? What matters are the people who spent the premium cost for premium parts, right? Because of the previous point: PCs don’t have some ubiquitous quality over the consoles, developers will always have to keep low-end PCs in mind, because not even half of all PC players can afford the good stuff, and you have to look at the top quarter of Steam players before you get to PS4-Pro-level specs. If every Steam player were to get a PS4 Pro, it would be an upgrade for over 60% of them, and 70% of them would be getting an upgrade with the Xbox One X.
Sure, you could still make the argument that when you pay more for PC parts, you get a better experience than you could with a console. We can argue all day about budget PCs, but a console can’t match up to a $1,000 PC build. It’s the same as paying more for car parts, in the end you get a better car. However, there is a certain problem with that…

“You pay a little more for a PC, you get much more quality.”

The idea here is that the more you pay for PC parts, the performance increases at a faster rate than the price does. Problem: that’s not how technology works. Paying twice as much doesn’t get you twice the quality the majority of the time.
For example, let’s look at graphics cards, specifically the GeForce 10 series cards, starting with the GTX 1050.
  • 1.8 TFLOP
  • 1.35 GHz base clock
  • 2 GB VRAM
  • $110
This is our reference, our basis of comparison. Any percentages will be based on the 1050’s specs.
Now let’s look at the GTX 1050 Ti, the 1050’s older brother.
  • 2.1 TFLOP
  • 1.29 GHz base clock
  • 4 GB VRAM
  • $140 retail
This is pretty good. You only increase the price by about 27%, and you get an 11% increase in floating point speed and a 100% increase (double) in VRAM. Sure you get a slightly lower base clock, but the rest definitely makes up for it. In fact, according to GPU boss, the Ti managed 66 fps, or a 22% increase in frame rate for Battlefield 4, and a 54% increase in mHash/second in bitcoin mining. The cost increase is worth it, for the most part.
But let’s get to the real meat of it; what happens when we double our budget? Surely we should see a massive increase performance, I bet some of you are willing to bet that twice the cost means more than twice the performance.
The closest price comparison for double the cost is the GTX 1060 (3 GB), so let’s get a look at that.
  • 3.0 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 3 GB VRAM
  • $200 retail
Well… not substantial, I’d say. About a 50% increase in floating point speed, an 11% increase in base clock speed, and a 1GB decrease in VRAM. For [almost] doubling the price, you don’t get much.
Well surely raw specs don’t tell the full story, right? Well, let’s look at some real wold comparisons. Once again, according to GPU Boss, there’s a 138% increase in hashes/second for bitcoin mining, and at 99 fps, an 83% frame rate increase in Battlefield 4. Well, then, raw specs does not tell the whole story!
Here’s another one, the 1060’s big brother… or, well, slightly-more-developed twin.
  • 3.9 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 6 GB VRAM
  • $250 retail
Seems reasonable, another $50 for a decent jump in power and double the memory! But, as we’ve learned, we shouldn’t look at the specs for the full story.
I did do a GPU Boss comparison, but for the BF4 frame rate, I had to look at Tom’s Hardware (sorry miners, GPU boss didn’t cover the mHash/sec spec either). What’s the verdict? Well, pretty good, I’d say. With 97 FPS, a 79% increase over the 1050— wait. 97? That seems too low… I mean, the 3GB version got 99.
Well, let’s see what Tech Power Up has to say...
94.3 fps. 74% increase. Huh.
Alright alright, maybe that was just a dud. We can gloss over that I guess. Ok, one more, but let’s go for the big fish: the GTX 1080.
  • 9.0 TFLOP
  • 1.6 GHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $500 retail
That jump in floating point speed definitely has to be something, and 4 times the VRAM? Sure it’s 5 times the price, but as we saw, raw power doesn’t always tell the full story. GPU Boss returns to give us the run down, how do these cards compare in the real world?
Well… a 222% (over three-fold) increase in mHash speed, and a 218% increase in FPS for Battlefield 4. That’s right, for 5 times the cost, you get 3 times the performance. Truly, the raw specs don’t tell the full story.
You increase the cost by 27%, you increase frame rate in our example game by 22%. You increase the cost by 83%, you increase the frame rate by 83%. Sounds good, but if you increase the cost by 129%, and you get a 79% (-50% cost/power increase) increase in frame rate. You increase it by 358%, and you increase the frame rate by 218% (-140% cost/power increase). That’s not paying “more for much more power,” that’s a steep drop-off after the third cheapest option.
In fact, did you know that you have to get to the 1060 (6GB) before you could compare the GTX line to a PS4 Pro? Not to mention that at $250, the price of a 1060 (6GB) you could get an entire PS4 Slim bundle, or that you have to get to the 1070 before you beat the Xbox One X.
On another note, let’s look at a PS4 Slim…
  • 1.84 TFLOP
  • 800 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $300 retail
…Versus a PS4 Pro.
  • 4.2 TFLOP
  • 911 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $400 retail
128% increase in floating point speed, 13% increase in clock speed, for a 25% difference in cost. Unfortunately there is no Battlefield 4 comparison to make, but in BF1, the frame rate is doubled (30 fps to 60) and the textures are taken to 11. For what that looks like, I’ll leave it up to this bloke. Not to even mention that you can even get the texture buffs in 4K. Just like how you get a decent increase in performance based on price for the lower-cost GPUs, the same applies here.
It’s even worse when you look at the CPU for a gaming PC. The more money you spend, again, the less of a benefit you get per dollar. Hardware Unboxed covers this in a video comparing different levels of Intel CPUs. One thing to note is that the highest i7 option (6700K) in this video was almost always within 10 FPS (though for a few games, 15 FPS) of a certain CPU in that list for just about all of the games.
…That CPU was the lowest i3 (6100) option. The lowest i3 was $117 and the highest i7 was $339, a 189% price difference for what was, on average, a 30% or less difference in frame rate. Even the lowest Pentium option (G4400, $63) was often able to keep up with the i7.
The CPU and GPU are usually the most expensive and power-consuming parts of a build, which is why I focused on them (other than the fact that they’re the two most important parts of a gaming PC, outside of RAM). With both, this “pay more to get much more performance” idea is pretty much the inverse of the truth.

“The console giants are bad for game developers, Steam doesn't treat developers as bad as Microsoft or especially Sony.”

Now one thing you might’ve heard is that the PS3 was incredibly difficult for developers to make games for, which for some, fueled the idea that console hardware is difficult too develop on compared to PC… but this ignores a very basic idea that we’ve already touched on: if the devs don’t want to make the game compatible with a system, they don’t have to. In fact, this is why Left 4 Dead and other Valve games aren’t on PS3, because they didn’t want to work with it’s hardware, calling it “too complex.” This didn’t stop the game from selling well over 10 million units worldwide. If anything, this was a problem for the PS3, not the dev team.
This also ignores that games like LittleBigPlanet, Grand Theft Auto IV, and Metal Gear Solid 4 all came out in the same year as Left 4 Dead (2008) on PS3. Apparently, plenty of other dev teams didn’t have much of a problem with the PS3’s hardware, or at the very least, they got used to it soon enough.
On top of that, when developing the 8th gen consoles, both Sony and Microsoft sought to use CPUs that were easier for developers, which included making decisions that considered apps for the consoles’ usage for more than gaming. On top of that, using their single-chip proprietary CPUs is cheaper and more energy efficient than buying pre-made CPUs and boards, which is far better of a reason for using them than some conspiracy about Sony and MS trying to make devs' lives harder.
Now, console exclusives are apparently a point of contention: it’s often said that exclusive can cause developers to go bankrupt. However, exclusivity doesn’t have to be a bad thing for the developer. For example, when Media Molecule had to pitch their game to a publisher (Sony, coincidentally), they didn’t end up being tied into something detrimental to them.
Their initial funding lasted for 6 months. From then, Sony offered additional funding, in exchange for Console Exclusivity. This may sound concerning to some, but the game ended up going on to sell almost 6 million units worldwide and launched Media Molecule into the gaming limelight. Sony later bought the development studio, but 1: this was in 2010, two years after LittleBigPlanet’s release, and 2: Media Molecule seem pretty happy about it to this day. If anything, signing up with Sony was one of the best things they could’ve done, in their opinion.
Does this sound like a company that has it out for developers? There are plenty of examples that people will use to put Valve in a good light, but even Sony is comparatively good to developers.

“There are more PC gamers.”

The total number of active PC gamers on Steam has surpassed 120 million, which is impressive, especially considering that this number is double that of 2013’s figure (65 million). But the number of monthly active users on Xbox Live and PSN? About 120 million (1, 2) total. EDIT: You could argue that this isn't an apples-to-apples comparison, sure, so if you want to, say, compare the monthly number of Steam users to console? Steam has about half of what consoles do, at 67 million.
Now, back to the 65 million total user figure for Steam, the best I could find for reference for PlayStation's number was an article giving the number of registered PSN accounts in 2013, 150 million. In a similar 4-year period (2009 - 2013), the number of registered PSN accounts didn’t double, it sextupled, or increased by 6 fold. Considering how the PS4 is already at 2/3 of the number of sales the PS3 had, even though it’s currently 3 years younger than its predecessor, I’m sure this trend is at least generally consistent.
For example, let’s look at DOOM 2016, an awesome faced-paced shooting title with graphics galore… Of course, on a single platform, it sold best on PC/Steam. 2.36 million Steam sales, 2.05 million PS4 sales, 1.01 million Xbox One sales.
But keep in mind… when you add the consoles sales together, you get over 3 million sales on the 8th gen systems. Meaning: this game was best sold on console. In fact, the Steam sales have only recently surpassed the PS4 sales. By the way VG charts only shows sales for physical copies of the games, so the number of PS4 and Xbox sales, when digital sales are included, are even higher than 3 million.
This isn’t uncommon, by the way.
Even with the games were the PC sales are higher than either of the consoles, there generally are more console sales total. But, to be fair, this isn’t anything new. The number of PC gamers hasn’t dominated the market, the percentages have always been about this much. PC can end up being the largest single platform for games, but consoles usually sell more copies total.
EDIT: There were other examples but... Reddit has a 40,000-character limit.

"Modding is only on PC."

Xbox One is already working on it, and Bethesda is helping with that.
PS4 isn't far behind either. You could argue that these are what would be the beta stages of modding, but that just means modding on consoles will only grow.

What’s the Point?

This isn’t to say that there’s anything wrong with PC gaming, and this isn’t to exalt consoles. I’m not here to be the hipster defending the little guy, nor to be the one to try to put down someone/thing out of spite. This is about showing that PCs and consoles are overall pretty similar because there isn’t much dividing them, and that there isn’t anything wrong with being a console gamer. There isn’t some chasm separating consoles and PCs, at the end of the day they’re both computers that are (generally) designed for gaming. This about unity as gamers, to try to show that there shouldn’t be a massive divide just because of the computer system you game on. I want gamers to be in an environment where specs don't separate us; whether you got a $250 PS4 Slim or just built a $2,500 gaming PC, we’re here to game and should be able to have healthy interactions regardless of your platform.
I’m well aware that this isn’t going to fix… much, but this needs to be said: there isn’t a huge divide between the PC and consoles, they’re far more similar than people think. There are upsides and downsides that one has that the other doesn’t on both sides. There’s so much more I could touch on, like how you could use SSDs or 3.5 inch hard drives with both, or that even though PC part prices go down over time, so do consoles, but I just wanted to touch on the main points people try to use to needlessly separate the two kinds of systems (looking at you PCMR) and correct them, to get the point across.
I thank anyone who takes the time to read all of this, and especially anyone who doesn’t take what I say out of context. I also want to note that, again, this isn’tanti-PC gamer.” If it were up to me, everyone would be a hybrid gamer.
Cheers.
submitted by WhyyyCantWeBeFriends to unpopularopinion [link] [comments]

I want to hear what you people would say: If you had $300 to spend on whatever you want, what would you buy?

Your limit is $300, but you can buy anything you want. Legal or not, as much or as little as you want.
I wanna hear what all you can think of.
EDIT: BONUS ROUND On top of the original question, what is either A. The most ridiculous thing you could buy with the money, or B. The most productive thing you could spend the money on if you were in college (gas/petrol, groceries, rent, tuition, and tuition do not count)
submitted by themedic143 to AskReddit [link] [comments]

Noob question: Buying an ASIC Miner; is it worth it?

I have the finances to buy one of the 2TH Cointerra's or some lowerend butterfly labs rack mount ASIC's, but will that pay off?I made some calculations and I should be able to pay off the first cointerra miner in about 3-4 months(at the current difficulty).Power bills are not an issue.Is it worth to invest in miners now, or wait?Also I've noticed the cointerra miners have a 90 day warranty, whilst butterfly has a lifetime warranty.Do ASIC break down often, or what?
submitted by D4M3 to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

ATI Radeon HD 4850 Bitcoin Mining How to Turn Your Bitcoin Into Naira Instantly Updated 2018 How to mine Bitcoin with GPU Video Card Windows 10 BITCOIN Mining Power usage using reference ATI 5870 at Stock and OC settings Bitcoin mining with ATI Radeon Sapphire HD 5850

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