UBUNTU BITCOIN MINING CPU – Outopri2004 BLOG

Is installing and compiling libraries as extremely frustrating and impossible for others as it is for me?

I don't know if it's my unconventional programming setup (VirtualBox Ubuntu 18), but I have never been able to simply follow the steps to compile a project or application without major problems happening.
Here are all some examples from me trying to build openpose tonight. It's what prompted me to make this post:
  1. Cmake must be updated because, for some reason, the default apt-get cmake is still the version from 2017!
  2. I had to specifically install python3.7-dev instead of python 3.6-dev even though everyone builds openpose with python3.5-dev (which I couldn't install).
  3. I had to mix and match commands from three different tutorials because following just one of any of them resulted in errors.
  4. Openpose would not compile because there was a typo in one of the third-party libraries that I found out only after diving deep into github. I had to vim and manually edit the source code to fix this one.
This sounds a bit whiny, and it may just be only to whine. But is this really how major packages are dealt with?
This is just one example, a month ago I spent a whole day just to compile a library by Google called mediapipe. In between these examples have been dozens of other libraries and packages where following the instructions was not sufficient and I needed to dive deep into terminology way above my head to try and debug some stupid problems and it seems to not be getting easier with time.
It just seems like such a major headache and the solutions are so arcane that I can't fathom how anyone even came up with them? It just looks like: Oh, simply apt-get llldldlepellelpv=3.5 the lllldldldelep3.5.1 has the bug on line 3,884 and then copy it into this other directory and make sure it's not done past 2PM otherwise you also have to meet this dependency by sacrificing your 3rd most valued possession by chucking it out of the 4 story apartment (incompatible with non-4-story apartments). This result will then be the 5th post on stack overflow and the only one that works. The others just reiterate the exact things you've already tried in judgemental tones or just go off the deep end completely with some insane-tier fixes, including running overcomplicated batch scripts they made which who knows what they do other than probably remotely install a bitcoin miner.
Plus not to mention that I'm trying to code with some of my classmates and the outcome of each of our slightly different setups results in every possible combination of bugs. No single set of instructions will make a major library compile on all of our ubuntu setups.
The setup of libraries (not even talking about incorporating them into my own project so that mine will compile alongside them) is just an extremely frustrating process. What are the secrets to doing it right and being able to know which magic commands fix the bugs?
submitted by Ari2010 to learnprogramming [link] [comments]

Bitcore BTX on BarterDEX ...!!! video Tutorial

Bitcore BTX on BarterDEX ...!!! video Tutorial
Artwork by Design Team - Bitcore BTX ® 2018
Hi everyone In this video one of our dedicated community members showing you how to use Bitcore on BarterDEX (Komodo decentralized exchange).
This exchange we kept it asleep for reasons that this in Beta version and we had not been able to consolidate volume .. but little by little we are integrating it even more.. here is a tutorial video made by an active member of the community, to see the use of BirterDex with Bitcore BTX.
Happy Trading
Watch the Video Here
https://preview.redd.it/8yeplnxeehl11.png?width=1440&format=png&auto=webp&s=136acc5bc77a50e4eff486ba8296a7a9c4749a99
Web: Official | News | Coin Specs | Roadmap | White Paper | Ecosystem | Network Update | Community | FAQ | Blog | Team Wallets: Windows | Win Wallet & Blockchain | Linux | Mac | iOS | Android | Eletrum | Zeltrez | Jaxx Liberty Exchanges: Bit Z | Cryptopia | hitBTC | VE Bitcoin | Exrates | Crypto Bridge | QBTC | Coinexchange | Octaex | Bitexlive | Bitibu | Trade Satoshi | PayCML | ExcoincialServices: Livingroom of Satoshi | Kamoney | Cryptonaut | EasyRabBit.net | LuckyGames.io | InstaSwap Block Explorers: InsightAPI | Crypto ID | Liivenet Mining Pools: Bitcorepool | Yiimp | Suprnova | Chainworks | Umine | Ant Mine Pool | Coin Miners | BSOD | BTXpool | Minersport | Omegapool | PoolGPU Market Info: CoinMarketCap | World Coin Index | Cryptocompare Source: Github | Kryptowerk | DgCarlosLeon
submitted by dgcarlosleon to bitcore_btx [link] [comments]

How to get a public static ip for your local lightning node

My lightning node is a node that is running locally on my server hardware in my house down under, far from the New Jersey Digitalocean datacenter, which is what will come up if you look up the ip of the node. This is done via an OpenVPN tunnel from your local machine to a VPS. I am doing this by renting a VPS from Digitalocean for $20 a month (2 vCPUs, 2GB RAM) running Ubuntu 18.04. You can do this just as easily on a $5 a month VPS with 1 vCPU and 1GB RAM or even a $2.50 a month VPS from Vultr with 512MB RAM. I needed the extra power because I have many web services running there as well.
This setup allows me to have a highly available lightning node, not affected by my home IP address changing. If you are using a mobile connection or have a CGNAT, you wont be able to port forward for your lightning node. This setup allows you to do so. You can also use this to make a portable lightning node, which can get you a full lightning node wherever you have power and internet, without having to mess with network settings. If you don't want others to know your home IP, this is a good option for privacy.
  1. Setup a local lightning node, preferably on a linux machine. I followed the Raspibolt tu`ial (with some tweaks) on a 2 vCPU and 8GB RAM VM running Ubuntu 16.04.
  2. Get a VPS with a static IP address. Digitalocean and Vultr VPSs already are. This VPS wont need much power, so get the cheapest one you can.
  3. Secure the VPS. I used this tutorial. Essentially, setup a non root user, use ssh keys, and setup ufw. Also make sure to allow port 9735 through ufw for lightning. I also additionally made adjustments to the ssh config and installed fail2ban.
  4. Setup an OpenVPN server on the VPS. I used this tutorial.
  5. Install on OpenVPN client on the local linux machine and connect to the server. The tutorial from step 4 shows how to this. Keep this connected for step 6.
  6. SSH into the VPS and figure out the OpenVPN IP address of the client. It should be 10.8.0.x. To figure out the x, setup a simple python web server or something on the local machine on port 8000 or something and open the port on ufw in the local machine. Keep the OpenVPN connection, and use a new ssh session when accessing your local machine. Don't kill the OpenVPN connection, as it may complicate things when finding the ip.
    mkdir testweb
    cd testweb
    echo hello >> index.html
    sudo ufw allow 8000
    python -m SimpleHTTPServer 8000
  7. SSH back into the VPS. Run the curl command below, and try all the numbers between 2-10 for x. When you get hello as your output, then you found the right IP. I found mine at 6. You may have to try higher numbers, but this is unlikely. You can kill your python webserver on your local machine once you find it.
    curl 10.8.0.x:8000
  8. Once you have the IP, you want to make this static, so it doesn't change when you reconnect. This is done on the VPS side, so ssh back into the VPS. This tutorial worked for me. Just make sure to change values like the CommonName and and the IP to match yours (client1 and 10.8.0.x). If it doesn't work search "make openvpn ip static" and look around.
  9. SSH into your local machine, and make the OpenVPN connection persistent. You can kill the OpenVPN connection now. Doing this and this worked for me. If it doesn't work search "openvpn keepalive" or "openvpn auto connect linux" or "make openvpn connection persistent linux".
  10. Restart your local machine, and make sure it connects on boot. Do the python webserver test again, and make sure the same ip is shown on the VPS, and it is still accessible.
  11. SSH back into the VPS. Now, you have to port forward with iptables. you have to add the 2 lines below starting with -A PREROUTING in the same place in your /etc/ufw/before.rules file. Here is what mine looks like. Change the x to your OpenVPN IP. Do sudo ufw disable and sudo ufw enable to restart ufw to update your changes.
    *nat
    :POSTROUTING ACCEPT [0:0]
    -A PREROUTING -i eth0 -p tcp -m tcp --dport 9735 -j DNAT --to-destination 10.8.0.x:9735
    -A PREROUTING -i eth0 -p udp -m udp --dport 9735 -j DNAT --to-destination 10.8.0.x:9735
    -A POSTROUTING -s 10.8.0.0/8 -o eth0 -j MASQUERADE
    COMMIT
  12. SSH into your local machine. Change your lnd.conf to match with this setup, like changing the externalip. Here is what my config looks like, a slight tweak from the Raspibolt one:
    [Application Options]
    debuglevel=info
    maxpendingchannels=5
    alias=GCUBED [LND]
    color=#68F442
    listen=0.0.0.0:9735
    externalip=157.230.95.74:9735
    [Bitcoin]
    bitcoin.active=1
    bitcoin.mainnet=1
    bitcoin.node=bitcoind
    [autopilot]
    autopilot.active=1
    autopilot.maxchannels=5
    autopilot.allocation=0.6
  13. Do a sudo service lnd restart to restart lnd and apply the changes. Remember to do a lncli unlock after any restarts. Your lnd node should now have a public static ip. Look it up a few hours after you do this on 1ml, your ip should be the one of your VPS now.
I am monitoring this for free with uptimerobot. It will notify you if it has gone down. So far mine has been running for 3 days and hasn't gone down.
EDIT: Formatting
EDIT 2: The main reason I didn't use a ddns or a hidden service was mainly for high uptime, and low latency. I am planning on developing a lapp with this node and I didn't want to risk any downtime. Running lightning as a hidden service is a great idea as well, this tutorial shows how to achieve something similar with the clearnet.
EDIT 3: You can achieve a similar result from using TOR
submitted by ggelango to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Getting frustrated with Ubuntu. Are my experiences the norm for a Linux user?

Let me start off by saying that I'm not a total newb, but still pretty green. I like to believe I'm capable with computers, and know enough to figure out most issues. I also have a pretty solid general understanding of how they function. Been a Windows user most of my life, but decided to make the switch to Linux a few years back.
My experiences thus far are making me reconsider the switch, despite the fact that I've really become opposed to using Windows. I'm curious if I should expect more of the same indefinitely, or if my experiences up to this point are unusual, and I should expect to reach a point where I can just use the OS, instead of spend hours trying to perform every task.
It all started when I downloaded Ubuntu about three years ago. I easily got it installed as a dual boot on a Windows machine. Had to start by allocating disk space in Windows for the new Linux install, prepared a live usb, went through the install, cake. Then I started trying to do stuff, like use a printer. Well HP doesn't make a driver for Linux and, probably, 2-4 hours of research led to me still not having a working printer. I found a driver, but the process to get it installed did not work as it was supposed to. I forget the specifics, but I followed a tutorial to the T, but ran into unforeseen installation issues, and never could figure out how to get the process complete.
After that I started running into issues with the FireFox browser. I've alwasy used FF on Windows with no issues. On Ubuntu it ran slower than dial-up from the mid-90's. Again, 2-4 hours worth of research and several changes to things like FF settings, disabling add-ons, etc., and I still had no fix.
Still I wasn't deterred. Then the dual boot broke. I tried boot repair. No dice. Tried for several hours to get it working. Asked about it on forums, sent in results of boot repair (where I forget) only to get no response, and finally I threw in the towel.
I also struggled to get Bitcoin Armory working, with some very frustrating success, but I didn't count that against Linux, since it was very new software, and I wasn't surprised it was buggy.
Fast forward to today. I've been using Windows for a couple years, with few attempts made to use Linux, except for trying to retrieve a very small amount of BTC from Armory, which consumed about three weekends of my life to finally achieve.
Now I've decided to give it another go. I downloaded UbuntuStudio b/c I'd like to use some of the music production software that comes with it.
Following some tutorials online, I tried to connect my midi keyboard to the computer using QJackCtl. I couldn't remember the issue that I ran into when starting to type this up, so I tried to repeat the process, only to have the program crash during start up, three times. The computer had literally just restarted 20 minutes ago, so I doubt a reboot would work, but maybe. It's almost funny at this point. I'm really disappointed that I can't get the audio software that came with the distro working "fresh out of the box." Maybe with a few hours, or weekends, worth of research?
I've also been getting a system error message every time I login. I posted a query on the Ubuntu forums. That issue has yet to be sorted out.
I hesitate to include this next part, because it involves software that is really still in it's early stages, and I'm trying to be realistic in taking the perspective that any problems I encounter are with the new software, not Ubuntu, but the fact that I had zero problems getting the same stuff to work in Windows just adds to my frustration with Ubuntu.
Everything I'm about to describe is involved with installing monero mining and wallet software. The exception is the AMD drivers needed for the GPU I'm using to mine. Those I expected to work without issue. I followed the directions for installing the AMD drivers for Ubuntu on the AMD website, and the program would not work. After, you guessed it, 2-4 hours of research, I finally, almost by accident, installed an older version of the driver software. Boom, it worked. WTF man?! When I installed the Windows version it took 2 minutes.
Moving on, I tried getting the xmr-stak mining software working. This took me several hours, spread over several days to sort out. Same with the monero-gui wallet, which actually I've only got half-way working. In fact, I've tried installing the monero-gui by two different ways. In the process I've inadvertently got the monerod daemon running, but not the gui. Actually, the monerod daemon starts with the computer and I haven't even started trying to figure out how to turn that off, since what's the point of having it run if I can't use the gui?
In Windows I had all of this up and running in a couple of hours. And in saying that I'm prepared for the "if you like Windows so much then use that!" or "you're just too thick to figure it out!", but I don't like Windows, and I don't think it's a matter of not figuring it out. It seems to me that the reason I've spent dozens of hours just trying to get things to work in Linux is that nearly every time I've tried to do something, there is inevatably some error along the way where following the directions isn't good enough, and sorting out the issue is a feat in and of itself.
I just want to know if this is unusual, or if this is how it's going to go forever if I keep using Linux. Is my experience typical?
TL;DR: I've had a litany of issues and spent countless hours trying to fix them using Linux. Is this rare, and I've just had an unusual experience, or actually pretty common, and I should just accept it as the cost of using an open source OS?
submitted by rtfioeti to Ubuntu [link] [comments]

(Updated) [Staking] Reddcoin Core client GUI wallet on a Raspberry Pi Model 3B

Intro

This thread is an update to my first Reddcoin staking tutorial that was written 7 months ago.
 
The reason for the update
My Reddcoin Core software crashed and became unusable. My Raspberry Pi 3B would lag and freeze, I couldn't stake anymore.
 
Instead of just redoing everything the same way, I wanted to see if I could improve on 3 points:
 
The updates
 
If you would like to tip me
Writing a tutorial like this takes time and effort; tips are appreciated. My Reddcoin address: RqvdnNX5MTam855Y2Vudv7yVgtXdcYaQAW.
     

Overview

 

Steps

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     

Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Snr5e8bzftI
This video shows how long it takes to start Reddcoin Core.   TL;DR:
     

Extra

Backup
Backup your wallet to prevent losing the RDDs in your wallet! There are two methods to backup, do both. Make new backups if you create a new receiving address!
 
 
   
Boot with only 1 USB drive plugged in:
Make sure only the USB drive (with the swap partition and data partition) is plugged in when you boot up your Raspberry Pi. This to make sure the swap partition (/dev/sda1) is recognized correctly.   If you boot up with multiple USB drives, Lubuntu might see the USB drive with the swap partition as the second drive (instead of the first drive), and ignore the 2 GB swap partition. If this happens, starting Reddcoin can render the Raspberry Pi unresponsive.
   
Connection issues If you have issues syncing the blockchain because you have 0 network connections, please follow the instructions in this thread.
   
Start Reddcoin Core easier
Run a shell script (.sh file), so you can start Reddcoin just by double clicking on an icon on your Desktop.
   
Minimization options
Adjust minimization options, so you can safely press on the X button (the close/exit button on the upper right corner).
   
RealVNC VNC Viewer (client) and VNC Connect (server): To remote connect to the Raspberry Pi, I use VNC Viewer ad VNC Connect from RealVNC.
 
   
Chromium as browser: The updates break Firefox, the browser crashes when you try to run it. Install another browser, Chromium, to solve this issue.
   
Updates / Upgrades
If Software Updater shows up and tells you that there is updated software available, do not install the updates using Software Updater. Use LXTerminal to update Lubuntu.  
     

Credits:

   
Credits in previous tutorial:
submitted by Yavuz_Selim to reddCoin [link] [comments]

Dogecoin on Linux - The Complete Beginner's Guide

I'm writing this because I couldn't find a single condensed guide on compiling the wallet and running mining software on linux, specficially Ubuntu/Linux Mint. I combed Bitcoin and Litecoin forums for similar problems I was running into and eventually got everything nailed down, so here it is in one place, for new Shibes.
If you want to make a Dogecoin directory in your downloads folder to keep things organized, you will need to modify these commands to refelct the change. So instead of going to ~/Downloads/ you will need to go to ~/Downloads/Dogecoin and be sure to put the zipped files there when you download them, but the commands will be the same otherwise.
cwayne18 put in the work to make a PPA for the QT client here.
Ubunutu/Mint/Debian users should be able to install the client with the following commands:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:cwayne18/doge sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install dogecoin-qt 
To update using this method, run
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade dogecoin-qt 
Compiling the Wallet Manually
I suggest using the PPA above, but if you want to compile manually, here you go.
1)Download the newest source from here. If you want to check out the Github page, click here
2)Unzip the package with the native client OR, navigate to your downloads and unzip
cd ~/Downloads unzip dogecoin-master.zip 
3)Now it's time to compile. You will need to install the dependencies, just copy and paste the following code. It will be a fairly large download and could take some time. It is always important to update before installing any new software, so we'll do that first and then install the dependencies.
sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade sudo apt-get install libssl-dev libdb-dev libdb++-dev libqrencode-dev qt4-qmake libqtgui4 libqt4-dev sudo apt-get install libminiupnpc-dev libminiupnpc8 libboost-all-dev build-essential git libboost1.53-all-dev 
4)Once that is done, go to the doge-coin master directory and compile:
cd ~/Downloads/dogecoin-maste sed -i 's/-mgw46-mt-sd-1_53//g' dogecoin-qt.pro qmake USE_UPNP=- USE_QRCODE=0 USE_IPV6=0 make -j3 
After running the qmake command you will likely see some text similar to
Project MESSAGE: Building without UPNP support Project MESSAGE: Building with UPNP supportRemoved plural forms as the target language has less forms. If this sounds wrong, possibly the target language is not set or recognized. 
It's perfectly normal, so don't worry about that.
Your Dogewallet is ready to go! The executable is in ~/Downloads/dogecoin-maste and called dogecoin-qt. Your wallet information is in ~/.dogecoin. You can run the wallet at any time by opening terminal and typing
cd ~/Downloads/dogecoin-maste ./dogecoin-qt 
Future upgrades to dogewallet are easy. Back up your wallet.dat, and simply follow the same directions above, but you'll be unzipping and building the newer version. You will likely need to rename the old dogecoin-master directory in ~/Downloads before unzipping the newest version and building. Also, it is likely that you will not need to install the dependencies again.
Alternate Method For Installing Dogecoin Wallet from Nicebreakfast
After installing the dependencies listed in step 3, open terminal, then navigate to where you want Dogecoin Wallet stored and run:
git clone https://github.com/dogecoin/dogecoin ./autogen.sh ./configure make 
then when the wallet is updated just run
git pull 
from the dogecoin directory.
GPU Mining
GPU mining requires CGminer. My suggestion is to get the executable already built. The creator of cgminer has removed the built file from his website, but I've uploaded it here
sudo apt-get install pkg-config opencl-dev libcurl4-openssl-dev autoconf libtool automake m4 ncurses-dev cd ~/Downloads tar -xvf cgminer-3.7.2-x86_64-built.tar.bz2 
Don't use anything newer than 3.7.2. The newer versions of CGMiner don't support GPU mining.
That's it! You have cgminer ready to go! You will run cgminer with the following syntax
cd ~/Downloads/cgminer-3.7.2-x86_64-built/ ./cgminer --scrypt -o stratum+tcp://SERVERNAME:PORT -u WORKER.ID -p PASS 
A good guide for fine tuning cgminer can be found here; follow the litecoin example.
EDIT
I had trouble getting cgminer running with a single line command, but running it via an executable .sh file works. This is covered in the cgminer setup guide I posted above but I'll put it here too. In the same directory that has the cgminer executable, you need to make a file called cgminer.sh and make it executable. It should contain the follwing:
export GPU_USE_SYNC_OBJECTS=1 export GPU_MAX_ALLOC_PERCENT=100 export DISPLAY=:0 find *.bin -delete sleep 5 ./cgminer 
Then you can call cgminer in terminal by doing ./cgminer.sh You will need a cgminer.conf file containing all your options. All of this is covered in the guide that is linked above.
A quick note about AMD drivers: They used to be a huge PITA to install and get working, but the newest Catalyst drivers are great. There's a GUI installer, everything works out of the box, and there is a lot of documentation. You can download them here: AMD Catalyst 14.6 Beta Linux
CPU Mining
For CPU mining I use minerd because it doesn't require any work to get running, simply download it and get to work. Download the built file for your machine 32-bit or 64-bit, and then unzip it and you're ready to go!
cd ~/Downloads tar -xvf pooler-cpuminer-2.3.2-linux-x86.tar.gz 
The executable is called minerd and it will be in ~/Downloads but you can move it to wherever you like. To run it, pull up terminal and do
cd ~/Downloads minerd --url=stratum+tcp://SERVER:PORT --userpass=USERNAME.WORKERNAME:WORKERPASSWORD 
You're done! Happy mining!
Common Issues
I ran into this and I've seen others with this problem as well. Everything installs fine but there is a shared library file that isn't where it should be. In fact, it isn't there at all.
 libudev.so.1: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory 
In terminal, do
sudo updatedb locate libudev.so.0.13.0 
And it will probably return a path /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu. Inside that directory there's a library file called libudev.so.0.13.0. You'll need to make a symlink (aka shortcut) that links libudev.so.1 to libudev.so.0.13.0 So, assuming you're working with libudev.so.0.13.0 do this
cd /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu sudo ln -s libudev.so.0.13.0 libudev.so.1 
Now if you do
ln -l 
You should see
libudev.so.1 -> ./libudev.so.0.13.0 
Meaning you've made the symlink. Also, the text for libudev.so.1 will be blue.
submitted by Boozybrain to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Welcome to r/STRAKS!

Welcome to STRAKS!

This thread is built to help users joining STRAKS and the STRAKS community. Please make sure to follow our rules (posted in the sidebar and below). Feel free to use this thread to introduce yourself and ask questions no matter how dumb :). This thread should be considered up to date. However, if you find something that is incorrect, out of date, or simply missing then please contact me or other moderators so we can update it. Thank you!

Getting Started

What is STRAKS?

STRAKS (STAK) is a cryptocurrency platform with only one goal in mind. Innovate e-commerce with the use of digital currency to facilitate smooth, instant, and secure e-commerce transactions.
With e-commerce sales projected to reach over $2.8 trillion in 2018 and $4.8 trillion in 2021 and Bitcoin showing signs of failure due to increasing fees and the inability to process large amounts of transactions, STRAKS seeks to take hold with the ability to process over 11 million transactions a day, 40 times the amount Bitcoin can process. This ensures that STRAKS will be able to handle every single transaction with a low fee. This keeps your transactions in a secure and trusted blockchain where miners keep your transactions and the networks secure and safe, making it the easiest and cheapest way to securely purchase goods online.
 
The main attributes of STRAKS are:

E-commerce

  • With quickly growing global e-commerce sales STRAKS seeks to assert itself by implementing relevant technologies achieved through development that will help make sure e-commerce transactions are smooth and quick.

Open Source

  • Open Source development allows anyone to contribute by simply making a pull request through GitHub. With anyone contributing innovation will lead to rapid product enhancements that will strengthen STRAKS market relevance.

Decentralized Ownership

  • Devolved ownership and access rights, this ensures that the application and STRAKS lifespan are not dependent on a single individual. This allows STRAKS future to be safeguarded, but also your investment and partnerships.

Community Oriented

  • Focusing on the importance of its community, the STRAKS development team is collecting feedback and suggestions from the community. Future implementations such a STRAKS-Vote is on the road-map that will allow STRAKS users to propose suggestions then vote on them. Coins collected from voting will form the basis of funding the idea.

Speed

  • With constant optimization towards transaction speeds you can send and receive STRAKS instantly. With the inclusion of Segwit that increase block-size and capacity it will ensure that the network grows. Segwit with the combination of a block interval of just 60 seconds ensures that your transaction with be confirmed quickly and safely.

Privacy

  • Nothing is more important to STRAKS than its community and investors. Safe-guarding both is key. To ensure that the currency remains fungible the Zerocoin protocol will be implemented. The currency will maintain equal values irrespective of past transactions, as transactions will remain untraceable and anonymous. This allows STRAKS to protect its long-term market position.

Self-funded

  • STRAKS seeks to be 100% self-funded, it has one of the lowest PoW fees on the market. A 5% fee on PoW insures that STRAKS is well-funded through its entire lifespan. This will allow STRAKS to support product development, business development, and operational expenses.
 
Differences Between Other Cryptocurrencies:
Comparison Chart STRAKS Bitcoin Bitcoin Cash Dash ZCash Vertcoin
Bitcoin Version 0.14.2.0 0.16.0 0.14.1.0 0.12.2.0 0.11.2.0 0.13.1.0
Block Size (MB) 4 1 8 1 2 1
Segwit Block Size (MB) 16 4 n/a n/a n/a 4
Block Time (Seconds) 60 600 600 150 150 150
Coin Base Maturity (Confirmations) 100 100 100 100 100 100
Transactions Per Second 133.3 3.3 26.7 13.3 13.3 13.3
Difficulty Algorithm D106 KGW D106 DGW Digishieldv3 KGW
Hashing Algorithm Lyra2rev2 SHA256 SHA256 X11 Equihash Lyra2rev2
ASIC Resistant x x x
Segwit x x x
Segwit2x x x x x x
Segwit4x x x x x x
Lightning Network Compatible x x x
Instant Payouts LN LN x InstantX x LN
Atomic Swaps x x x
Max Coin Supply (Millions) 150 21 21 21 21 84
Budget Funding 5% 0% 0% 10% 20% 0%
Masternodes x x x x
Zerocoin Protocol WIP x x x x x
Zk-snarks x x x x x

Wallet Downloads

Useful Links

Block Explorer: https://straks.info
Discord Channel: https://discord.straks.tech
STRAKS Discord Forums: https://straks.co
STRAKS ANN: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2433318.0
STRAKS Facebook: https://facebook.straks.tech
STRAKS GitHub: https://github.com/straks/straks
STRAKS News: https://straks.tech/insight/
STRAKS Telegram: https://telegram.straks.tech
STRAKS Twitter: https://twitter.straks.tech

Exchanges

BarterDEX: https://github.com/KomodoPlatform/BarterDEX
BitexLive: https://bitexlive.com/exchange/BTC-STAK
Coinhouse: https://coinhouse.eu/markets/stakbtc
Crex24: https://crex24.com/exchange/STAK-BTC
CryptoBridge: https://wallet.crypto-bridge.org/market/BRIDGE.STAK_BRIDGE.BTC
Stocks.Exchange: https://stocks.exchange/trade/STAK/BTC
SouthXchange: https://www.southxchange.com/Market/Book/STAK/BTC

Mining Information

Mining Pools

Software

Nvidia:

AMD:

Tutorials

STRAKS Tips

  • The easiest way to find your own STRAKS address is in the STRAKS Core wallet under the File -> Receiving Addresses tab.
  • Encrypting your wallet with a secure password helps ensure that your STRAKS can't be stolen. Do not leave your wallets unencrypted!
  • A community member currently hosts a STRAKS faucet found at https://straks.network . Please be sure to thank MrMcMichael for this service!
submitted by DalmationCadet to straks [link] [comments]

Step by step in staking Redd with Raspberry Pi 3

Before I start, I would like to pay complete credits to these two guys :)
https://www.reddcointalk.org/topic/2679/reddcoin-staking-via-ubuntu-mate-on-raspberry-pi-3-model-b-march-2018 (most of my steps, if not all, are from this link)
https://github.com/joroob/reddcoin/blob/mastedoc/build-arm.md
All the steps I am writing is ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY, please don't try to skip it because I did, and it doesn't work.
step 1: get a Raspberry Pi B https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/#buy-now-modal
step 2: make sure you get proper power supply 5v 2A - the Pi will mine, it will need sufficient power. Regular USB samsung charger will not work.
step 3: get proper micro SD card (SanDisk for example) 32Gb++
step 4: USB + Mouse keyboard
step 5: flash micro SD card with Ubuntu MATE
Download Ubuntu Mate image: https://ubuntu-mate.org/raspberry-pi/
Download Etcher: https://etcher.io
After finishing downloading, use Etcher to write/flash the image on micro SD card
After this, your SD card contains Ubuntu MATE OS.
step 6: Place SD Card into Raspberry Pi 3 and start it up. You should be able to see Ubuntu OS! Congrats!
step 7: Connect to wifi or internet cable (internet is better and faster)
step 8: OPTIONAL - turn off UI OS, so that things will work faster
Open XTerminal:
sudo systemctl disable lightdm.service (to turn UI off) 
in case you want to turn UI on again, run this:
sudo systemctl start lightdm.service (to turn UI on) 
step 9: install all dependencies
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install git build-essential libqt4-dev libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler libtool autotools-dev autoconf libssl-dev libboost-all-dev wget pkg-config sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install db4.8 sudo apt-get install libminiupnpc-dev sudo apt-get install libqrencode-dev Reboot 
step 10: add additional RAM (sort of) in case the App need it, this is call "Create Swap file"
sudo fallocate -l 1G /swapfile sudo chmod 600 /swapfile sudo mkswap /swapfile sudo swapon /swapfile echo ‘/swapfile none swap sw 0 0’ | sudo tee -a /etc/fstab 
step 11: Build Berkeley Database
wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-4.8.30.NC.tar.gz tar xfvz db-4.8.30.NC.tar.gz cd db-4.8.30.NC cd build_unix ../dist/configure --enable-cxx make sudo make install 
step 11.5: Set BerkeleyDB path
export CPATH="/uslocal/BerkeleyDB.4.8/include" export LIBRARY_PATH="/uslocal/BerkeleyDB.4.8/lib" export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/uslocal/BerkeleyDB.4.8/lib/ 
step 12: Build Reddcoin Wallet
---download source code ---- only source from joroob/reddcoin will work because some stweak was needed for ARM CPU
cd ~ git clone https://github.com/joroob/reddcoin.git 
---build reddcoin ----
cd reddcoin ./autogen.sh ./configure --with-gui=no --disable-tests cd src make sudo make install 
If you finish this, you are in a great position!!!
step 13: Create reddcoin configuration file
cd ~ mkdir .reddcoin && cd .reddcoin nano reddcoin.conf rpcuser=YOUR OWN USERNAME, YOU DONT NEED TO REMEMBER THIS, MAKE IT AS LONG AS YOU WANT rpcpassword=YOUR OWN PASS WORD, YOU DONT NEED TO REMEMBER THIS, MAKE IT AS LONG AS YOU WANT 
step 14: Use bootstrap
(At this point, you had a running reddcoin daemon, now you can start staking. But syncing the full chain takes long time.)
cd ~/.reddcoin wget https://github.com/reddcoin-project/reddcoin/releases/download/v2.0.1.2/bootstrap.dat.xz xz -d bootstrap.dat.xz 
step 15: start the reddcoin daemon service cd ~/reddcoin/src ./reddcoind -daemon
After this, you can test if the daemon is working, by perform this command: ./reddcoin-cli getblockcount
step 16: if your app is not able to sync, it is probably the firewall issue with OS, run this to allow port 45444 (used by Reddcoin) and redo step 15
sudo iptables -I INPUT 1 -i eth0 -p tcp --dport 45444 -j ACCEPT sudo iptables -A OUTPUT -p tcp --dport 45444 -j ACCEPT 
step 17: open BEER and enjoy! This is a MUST or the daemon will stop working! I am not kidding!
step 18: Actually, i forgot to mention you need to execute this command for the wallet to stake:
reddcoind walletpassphrase $yourpassword 9999999 true 
ADDITIONAL REMARKS:
From my PC: I am using putty to execute the command, winSCP to monitor the file location on raspberry.
Moving Red Coins out of exchange really a big move, start with normal wallet, don't start with this tutorial :) Ever since I move my coins out of exchange, I am free from all of the ups and downs! Really!
So guys and gals, Redd On!
UPDATE 18 Mar: my first stake has arrived after 6 days staking :)
In case you want to tip me: RaF3TeWqgTzAdnaZQffnsxS74dag13zsAY
Edit 1: Format stuff
Edit 2: Add step 18 to execute staking command.
Edit 3: In case you don't want to compile the source code, you can download my compile version here: https://github.com/hieplenet/reddcoin/releases/tag/v2.0.0.0 (but doing this, you should be aware of the risk of me changing source code for my benefit - I don't change any thing, but you should be cautious, this is the internet :) )
submitted by hieplenet to reddCoin [link] [comments]

Safex FAQ #2 The Wallet

FAQ #1 General Questions
FAQ #2 The Wallet
FAQ #3 Timeframes, Chille Dividends, Dividend Calculator:
FAQ #4 The Marketplace, Trade Volumes, Market Cap, Partnerships/Publicity, Miscellaneous
Wallet:
1. Is there a software, paper, online wallet?
There is a Mac, Windows, and Ubuntu Linux wallet which can be downloaded from https://safex.io/ . For security there is no online wallet.
There is a paper wallet available https://safex.io/keys Dan has stated that if you keep you coins in the software wallet and don’t send from there, and keep your keys safe, then it is very secure.
2. Should I keep my coins on the exchange?
In general if you plan to hold it is better to transfer to the software wallet. Better to have control of your own keys.
3. How do I transfer my coins from Bittrex to my wallet?
Check the tutorial Or this post
4. I transferred my coins to my wallet from Bittrex but it is taking a long time, is this normal?
Depending on blockchain traffic it can take some time. I would only start to make enquiries if it has been more than 36 hours.
5. How do I transfer coins from my wallet to another address?
Please see the wallet tutorial
6. Why do I need BTC in my wallet to transfer my coins?
Currently Safex coins reside on the bitcoin blockchain so every time you send coins from any address to address there is a “mining” fee. This is not unique to Safex, and you pay fees to send any coin (try sending some BTC and you will see). In the future we will migrate to the chille blockchain where we expect fees would be lower. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z7a2XL8EfGw
7. Why is there a small amount of BTC in my wallet when I transfer Safex there?
This is needed since we are on the bitcoin blockchain (the value is very small).
8. My virus scanner / malware detector won’t let me install the wallet, why?
We are currently waiting on signing keys from Apple (we have from Microsoft). This will be corrected in the next wallet update (in October).
9. How can I secure my wallet/keys?
Great question, very important. In short, once you have transferred safex to your wallet you need to export your private keys, print them out, and hide them where no one else will find them. You can also export an excrypted wallet.dat file from which you can rebuild your wallet (you will need to remember your wallet password). Daniel has a good video
submitted by znffal to safex [link] [comments]

Raspberry Pi Home Dashboard

I had a few requests of my home dashboard, and wanted to share with everyone how I put it together.
What you'll need:
Step 1: Instructions to Set Up the Raspberry Pi Itself:
Step 2: Set up the HTML File to Display
/home/pi/html
  1. Background.png
  2. Dashboard.html
  3. News.html
  4. Map.html
  5. Stocks.html
  6. ToDo.html
  7. Weather.html
  8. Calendar.html
FINAL Comments. This project probably took me 1h to set up the pi. And 4ish hours stumbling around to get the dashboard set up. My only real outlay was a monitor mount and a new monitor. Best of luck!
EDIT Here is the link for the current version of the dashboard. I removed the traffic for the weekend, but this is the dashboard. I have some formatting I really want to do (headings et al), but this should be a decent start. I have also included the color scheme I used.
submitted by fuzzyaces to raspberry_pi [link] [comments]

Use the BTCP full Node on a Ubuntu 16.04 LTS from Terminal

In this post I want to show some use of the CLI BTCP wallet from linux terminal.
DISCLAIMER:
First of all, use this tutorial with small amount of BTCP, for example i used 0,01 BTCP, until you feel confortable with commands. An error can happen easily and as result you can loose your money. Be careful! Do it at your risk!
I consider you have already installed the wallet following this instructions:
https://github.com/BTCPrivate/bitcoinprivate
I use Ubuntu 16.04 LTS 64bit, but commands are similar for the windows client.
Open a terminal from your Ubuntu Desktop:
[email protected]:~$ 
type:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcpd --daemon 
you should see the message:
BTCP server starting 
This means the wallet is running in daemon mode.
to stop the node just typing:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli stop 
Answer:
BTCP server stopping 
You can also run the wallet in terminal, is nice to see it, let's try:
 [email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcpd 
You will see the BTCP logo in text mode and the following info:
Thank you for running a Bitcoin Private node! You're strengthening the network and contributing to a social good. To ensure you are fully protecting your privacy when running BTCP, see . Block height | 340079 Connections | 8 Network solution rate | 8359387 Sol/s You are currently not mining. To enable mining, add 'gen=1' to your btcprivate.conf and restart. Since starting this node 1 minutes, 33 seconds ago: - You have validated 695 transactions! [Press Ctrl+C to exit] [Set 'showmetrics=0' to hide] 
See, you can also mine using the wallet! Nice! Just add gen=1 in the file btcprivate.conf. Probably you will never mine a coin, but still you to strenght the net, so, you can try if you want, then disable it when done:
Press CTRL and C to stop the server, then restart the server in daemon mode otherwhise you have to open a new terminal.
Let's find btcprivate.conf and other useful files:
[email protected]:~$ cd .btcprivate [email protected]:~/.btcprivate$ ls 
Answer:
blocks btcprivate.conf chainstate db.log debug.log fee_estimates.dat peers.dat wallet.dat 
You see here: btcprivate.conf and wallet.dat
Edit configuration file:
[email protected]:~/.btcprivate$ pico btcprivate.conf 
add gen=1 if you want to mine, then CTRL X and Y to save.
Restart the wallet....and....
Block height | 340091 Connections | 8 Network solution rate | 8211926 Sol/s Local solution rate | 0.0075 Sol/s Since starting this node 8 minutes, 5 seconds ago: - You have validated 684 transactions! - You have completed 1 Equihash solver runs. You are mining with the default solver on 1 threads. 
Congratulations! You are mining!
Now have a look to the wallet.dat file:
Nb: wallet.dat is your wallet!! If you delete it you will loose all your money!!!
wallet.dat is not encrypted, so, if you want to backup it i do as follows:
[email protected]:~/.btcprivate$ cp wallet.dat home/btcp/Desktop/wallet_btcp_back.dat 
Now you will find the wallet on your desktop. Zip it with an AES256 encryption and a strong password. Test if it works properly: extract it again and copy it in the directory, but before make an other copy of the wallet.dat file. Beware! I almost deleted the file once!
Nb: wallet.dat is your wallet!! If you delete it you will loose all your money!!!
Go back to your home directory, now, we want to play with our wallet:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli help 
if everything is running properly, you will see a list of commands like this:
z_exportwallet "filename" z_getbalance "address" ( minconf ) z_getnewaddress z_getoperationresult (["operationid", ... ]) z_getoperationstatus (["operationid", ... ]) z_gettotalbalance ( minconf ) z_importkey "zkey" ( rescan startHeight ) z_importwallet "filename" z_listaddresses z_listoperationids z_listreceivedbyaddress "address" ( minconf ) z_sendmany "fromaddress" [{"address":... ,"amount":...},...] ( minconf ) ( fee ) z_shieldcoinbase "fromaddress" "tozaddress" ( fee ) zcbenchmark benchmarktype samplecount zcrawjoinsplit rawtx inputs outputs vpub_old vpub_new zcrawkeygen zcrawreceive zcsecretkey encryptednote zcsamplejoinsplit [email protected]:~$ 
Nice! Wallet is running properly. Now try an other command: getinfo
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getinfo 
Answer:
{ "version": 1001251, "protocolversion": 180004, "walletversion": 60000, "balance": 0.00000000, "blocks": 340074, "timeoffset": 0, "connections": 8, "proxy": "", "difficulty": 167290.7158221716, "testnet": false, "keypoololdest": 1528833903, "keypoolsize": 101, "paytxfee": 0.00000000, "relayfee": 0.00000100, "errors": "" } [email protected]:~$ 
You see some useful info about your wallet/node:
blocks is the block heights, in this case is synced with the network. If not the number would be lower.
The wallet is connected to other 8 nodes, the balance is 0.00 BTCP
An other info command can be getblockchaininfo:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getblockchaininfo 
Answer:
{ "chain": "main", "blocks": 340074, "headers": 340074, "bestblockhash": "0000000145c0011d8e914f4ba68d1443c7ae0dd15bdf0bc300994dd5282710aa", "difficulty": 165971.1181999981, "verificationprogress": 0.9999992572690658, "chainwork": "0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000002e8314e4484da", "pruned": false, "commitments": 663480, 
we see syncing is almost finished:
"verificationprogress": 0.9999992572690658, (99,99999%)
Now test the wallet with command getwalletinfo
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getwalletinfo 
Answer:
{ "walletversion": 60000, "balance": 0.00000000, "unconfirmed_balance": 0.00000000, "immature_balance": 0.00000000, "txcount": 0, "keypoololdest": 1528833903, "keypoolsize": 101, "paytxfee": 0.00000000 } [email protected]:~$ 
Now we want to send some btcp to this wallet. First we need an address, get one using getnewaddress:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getnewaddress 
Answer:
b1Cabjwvcce7N8ea9Gxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx [email protected]:~$ 
Send at this address some BTCP, i sent 0.01 for testing purpose using your ledger, or your wallet, then check if the transaction is done:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getwalletinfo 
Answer:
{ "walletversion": 60000, "balance": 0.00000000, "unconfirmed_balance": 0.01000000, "immature_balance": 0.00000000, "txcount": 1, "keypoololdest": 1528833903, "keypoolsize": 101, "paytxfee": 0.00000000 } 
Done! Unconfirmed balance is 0.01! Just wait some confirmations.
after a while:
"walletversion": 60000, "balance": 0.01000000, "unconfirmed_balance": 0.00000000, "immature_balance": 0.00000000, "txcount": 1, "keypoololdest": 1528833903, "keypoolsize": 101, "paytxfee": 0.00000000 
Now send the coins to a new address. I am using this command:
sendtoaddress "btcpaddress" amount ( "comment" "comment-to" subtractfeefromamount )
subtractfeefromamount parameter can be true or false
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli sendtoaddress "b1Nb42GoK9kmsxxxxxxxxxxxxx" 0.01 "" "" true 
Answer:
2c5d3d1a3b5eec414b721d3817487f53c5eebxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx [email protected]:~$ 
Now check the wallet:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getwalletinfo 
Answer:
{ "walletversion": 60000, "balance": 0.00999808, "unconfirmed_balance": 0.00000000, "immature_balance": 0.00000000, "txcount": 2, "keypoololdest": 1528833903, "keypoolsize": 101, "paytxfee": 0.00000000 } 
I sent BTCP to the same wallet, so now i have less BTCP because of the fees.
try more commands:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli listreceivedbyaddress 
Answer:
[ { "address": "b1Ep2wi2tUnKf433Vaxxxxxxxxxxxx", "account": "", "amount": 0.01000000, "confirmations": 6, "txids": [ "833533440a13c09fda6e90d0c5xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx" ] }, { "address": "b1Nb42GoK9kmsVZ9KPxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "account": "", "amount": 0.00999808, "confirmations": 1, "txids": [ "2c5d3d1a3b5eec414b721d3817487f53c5xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx" ] } 
This is the list of all used addresses.
Now find the money and the address where they are: use listunspent
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli listunspent 
Answer:
[ { "txid": "2c5d3d1a3b5eec414b721d381748xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "vout": 0, "generated": false, "address": "b1Nb42GoK9kxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "account": "", "scriptPubKey": "76a914c6bdf3bc8aedxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "amount": 0.00999808, "confirmations": 6, "spendable": true 
Well done.
Other useful commands can be: dumpprivkey to extract the private key from an address
Be careful! Exposing your private keys will end in loosing your money
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli dumpprivkey b1Ep2wi2tUnxxxxxxxxxxx 
Obtaining the pvt key:
Kz29e62Bmxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 
And now, swipe the private key using the command: importprivkey "btcpprivkey" ( "label" rescan )
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli importprivkey "Kz29e62Bmxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx" "" true 
Let's do a shielded transaction!
first, you must have a z_address:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli z_getnewaddress 
Answer:
zkEvCiVwgHb3NFi2ee9HGPjno2xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 
Check balaces, with also z_addres:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli z_gettotalbalance 
Answer:
{ "transparent": "0.00999808", "private": "0.00", "total": "0.00999808" } 
Now send some BTCP to the z_address. First, check where BTCP are:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli listunspent 
Output:
[ { "txid": "72f568d1ed51524b69f1xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "vout": 0, "generated": false, "address": "b1LDhxBJxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "scriptPubKey": "76axxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxe088xx", "amount": 0.00889808, "confirmations": 556, "spendable": true } ] 
Now, sent a little transparent amount to the shielded address we got before:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli z_sendmany "b1LDhxBJxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx" "[{\"amount\":0.001, \"address\":\"zkEvCiVwgHb3xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx\"}]" 
Output:
opid-xxxxxxx-36c4-xxxx-beb2-xxxxxxxxxxxx 
Now your PC will work a while, it's CPU consuming...so...check:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli z_getoperationresult 
until you receive the answer:
[ { "id": "opid-xxxxxx-xxxxx-4a5d-beb2-xxxxxxxxxx", "status": "success", "creation_time": 1529426885, "result": { "txid": "f87e8d5e96a8a0xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx" }, "execution_secs": 216.686332567, "method": "z_sendmany", "params": { "fromaddress": "b1LDhxxxxxxxxxxx", "amounts": [ { "amount": 0.001, "address": "zkEvCiVwgHb3NFxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxR" } ], "minconf": 1, "fee": 0.0001 } } ] 
Done! On my old PC it took 216.68 seconds!
Next will be a reverse operation, from Shielded address to transparent address. See you soon....
Play with your full node wallet and have fun.
Remember: these commands are almost the same in all the bitcoin based coins, so you also learnt how to use many other wallets!
submitted by xivan71 to u/xivan71 [link] [comments]

Using firejail to sandbox firefox profiles in Ubuntu+Unity

DISCLAIMER : read the comments in this thread, some things had to be corrected
also, this is super experimental, i have no idea what I'm doing
Hi everyone,
I'm in love with firefox and although it and mozilla are far from perfect I can't live without them. I am on ubuntu and was looking for ways to have several individual browsers, isolated from one another and as secure as possible. This way I can browse the web with almost all sites broken due to very restricting addons, but also (in a different workspace) have a protonmail instance running, while also having an "out of the box" install of firefox to allow access to sites that have to be not broken (related to my job) and having a separate instance of my bitcoin exchange running. Those are just examples, you can also have a separate window running only porn sites and adjust their nicelevel.
The purpose was to have all those process running independantly and isolated, to avoid threat propagation.
Some pros : security, allows to edit the nicelevel of each sandbox
Some cons : this setup also implies that you have to maintain all those profile of firefox, because all your about:config files are located in your profile folder and so are independent. This also means that you'll have to configure each addon independently (except if you copy part of the profile folder to your new folders etc) I'm also not in IT and frankly have no idea of secure this is but hey, I'm learning. And I have no idea if this works with other distros or desktop environement either.
I'm doing this post because I think it might be of interest but it's christmas and I don't have time to make a clean written tutorial, suggestions are extremely encouraged and if it doesn't work because I'm not clear enough don't hesitate to ask in the comments.
So here's the gist of it.
where alpha has to be added to the Actions field, beta is the name of the instance (this will appear when you right click on the icon), gamma is the nicelevel you will attribute to every process inside your sandbox (very useful), delta is the name of your profile.
Now all you have to do is right click on the firefox icon and see that you have added new options, when clicking on them you will automatically execute the exec lines and have a new firejail instance running with your new addons, about:config file, bookmarks and so on. All isolated from one another.
To check that eveything is right, you can run firejail --list to see if indeed firejail is running all the desired instances.
1 : actually if you enter firejail --private firefox -no-remote -private you can have a private firefox session in a sandbox but without any addons, this means ads in porn sites :/
submitted by IsopropylWick to privacy [link] [comments]

Uso del Full Node Wallet BTCP Bitcoin Private da Terminale Linux

In questo post voglio dimostrare alcuni utilizzi del Full Node Wallet Bitcoin Private da terminale Linux
AVVERTENZA:
Usate questo tutorial con un piccolo quantitativo di BTCP, nell'esempio utilizzo 0,01 BTCP, almeno fino a quando non vi sentite sicuri nell'uso dei comandi. Fate attenzione! I comandi vengono eseguiti senza possibilità di annullarli, salvo in casi eccezionali, quindi fate tutto a vostro rischio.
PREMESSA:
Il wallet è già stato installato sul vostro PC o in un server Cloud usando le seguenti istruzioni:https://github.com/BTCPrivate/bitcoinprivate
Io uso una Ubuntu 16.04 LTS 64bit, ma i comandi sono simili anche per la distribuzione Windows.
Andrebbe anche aperta la porta TCP 7932 per avere un wallet perfettamente funzionante, ma ho fatto le prove senza aprirla.
Come attivare il firewall:
sudo ufw status
Please note: Make sure you enter the code in this order! If you do not, the program will not work! (If need be you can disable your firewall by entering: sudo ufw disable)
sudo ufw default allow outgoing sudo ufw default deny incoming sudo ufw allow ssh/tcp sudo ufw limit ssh/tcp sudo ufw allow http/tcp sudo ufw allow https/tcp sudo ufw allow 7932/tcp sudo ufw logging on sudo ufw enable
Apri un nuovo terminale troverai il prompt dei comandi, il mio è così, ma potrebbe essere differente:
[email protected]:~$ 
Scrivi quello che segue e premi invio:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcpd --daemon 
dovrebbe apparire il seguente messaggio:
BTCP Server Starting 
Questo significa che hai avviato il server (full node wallet) in modalità daemon, silenziosa. Per fermarlo scrivi:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli stop 
Otterrai la risposta:
BTCP server stopping 
Puoi anche avviare il wallet in una finestra del terminale e vederlo lavorare, anzichè usare il comando --daemon
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcpd 
Vedreai apparire un logo del BTCP formato da tanti caratteri e la seguente scritta:
Thank you for running a Bitcoin Private node! You're strengthening the network and contributing to a social good. To ensure you are fully protecting your privacy when running BTCP, see . Block height | 340079 Connections | 8 Network solution rate | 8359387 Sol/s You are currently not mining. To enable mining, add 'gen=1' to your btcprivate.conf and restart. Since starting this node 1 minutes, 33 seconds ago: - You have validated 695 transactions! [Press Ctrl+C to exit] [Set 'showmetrics=0' to hide] 
Block height è l'allineamento del wallet con la blockchain, richiede tempo perchè si allinei e scarichi tutta la blockchain, dipende dalla velocità del tuo collegamento e del tuo pc.Connections: 8 sono i nodi a cui è collegato il nostro wallet, che è un vero e proprio nodo.
Network solution rate è la "potenza" di tutta la rete di elaborare i blocchi in Sol/s
Con un full node puoi partecipare anche tu a rafforzare la rete, abilitando il mining. Si tratta di un solo mining, quindi le probabilità di risolvere un blocco sono veramente minime.
Per farlo basta aggiungere la voce gen=1 nel file btcprivate.conf
Proviamo a farlo. Blocchiamo il nodo con il comando CTRL + C e aspettiamo che appaia il prompt di comando.
Appena appare, inseriamo i seguenti comandi:
[email protected]:~$ cd .btcprivate [email protected]:~/.btcprivate$ ls 
ci siamo spostati nella directory nascosta (inizia per .) contenente i file di configurazione di BTCP, ls mostra i file contenuti:
blocks btcprivate.conf chainstate db.log debug.log fee_estimates.dat peers.dat wallet.dat 
puoi vedere il file btcprivate.conf e wallet.dat che è il file del wallet del nodo. Editiamo ora il file di configurazione, io uso PICO, un text editor per linux, ma potete usare anche vi se preferite:
[email protected]:~/.btcprivate$ pico btcprivate.conf 
inserite gen=1 in una riga vuota del file di configurazione e poi chiudete l'editor salvando con i comandi CTRL+X e Y
gen=1 
tornate nella directory home:
[email protected]:~/.btcprivate$ cd 
Fate riavviare il wallet con il comando:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcpd 
Otterrete il seguente output:
Block height | 340091 Connections | 8 Network solution rate | 8211926 Sol/s Local solution rate | 0.0075 Sol/s Since starting this node 8 minutes, 5 seconds ago: - You have validated 684 transactions! - You have completed 1 Equihash solver runs. You are mining with the default solver on 1 threads. 
Congratulazioni! State minando!
Ora diamo un occhiata al file wallet.dat
ATTENZIONE:
wallet.dat è il vostro wallet, se lo cancellate o lo riscrivete perderete tutti i BTCP che contiene. Consiglio di farne una copia ma attenzione: wallet.dat non è crittografato, quindi vi consiglio di crittografarlo prima di spostarlo dal PC: primo faccio una copia.
Bloccate nuovamente il wallet con CTRL+C
Al prompt scrivete:
[email protected]:~$ cd .btcprivate 
Poi copiate il file sul Desktop (scrivania) Sostituite la parola Desktop con Scrivania se avete installato Linux in Italiano
[email protected]:~/.btcprivate$ cp wallet.dat home/btcp/Desktop/wallet_btcp_back.dat 
Ora troverete il file wallet_btcp_back.dat sulla scrivania, crittografatelo AES256 usando il gestore degli archivi GUI e impostando una password resistente. Per verificare che tutto funzioni, vi consiglio di fare una altra copia di wallet.dat, estrarre il file dall'archivio crittato e sostituirlo al wallet.dat. se tutto funziona siete a posto. Se non siete sicuri non fate nulla e non usate questo wallet per mettere i vostri BTCP, ma nolo per scopi didattici con pochi spiccioli. E' facile fare errori e perdere tutto.
Tornate alla directory home e riavviate il server in daemon mode.
proviamo alcuni comandi usando il client: btcp-cli
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli help 
Se tutto funziona correttamente vi risponderà con la lista di tutti i comandi disponibili:
z_exportwallet "filename" z_getbalance "address" ( minconf ) z_getnewaddress z_getoperationresult (["operationid", ... ]) z_getoperationstatus (["operationid", ... ]) z_gettotalbalance ( minconf ) z_importkey "zkey" ( rescan startHeight ) z_importwallet "filename" z_listaddresses z_listoperationids z_listreceivedbyaddress "address" ( minconf ) z_sendmany "fromaddress" [{"address":... ,"amount":...},...] ( minconf ) ( fee ) z_shieldcoinbase "fromaddress" "tozaddress" ( fee ) zcbenchmark benchmarktype samplecount zcrawjoinsplit rawtx inputs outputs vpub_old vpub_new zcrawkeygen zcrawreceive zcsecretkey encryptednote zcsamplejoinsplit [email protected]:~$ 
Benissimo! Ora proviamo ad usare qualche comando, comunciamo con getinfo
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getinfo 
Risposta:
{ "version": 1001251, "protocolversion": 180004, "walletversion": 60000, "balance": 0.00000000, "blocks": 340074, "timeoffset": 0, "connections": 8, "proxy": "", "difficulty": 167290.7158221716, "testnet": false, "keypoololdest": 1528833903, "keypoolsize": 101, "paytxfee": 0.00000000, "relayfee": 0.00000100, "errors": "" } [email protected]:~$ 
Nella risposta troverete alcune informazioni sul wallet, versione, block height, connections, balance = 0 ecc ecc
Proviamo ora getblockchaininfo:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getblockchaininfo 
Risposta:
{ "chain": "main", "blocks": 340074, "headers": 340074, "bestblockhash": "0000000145c0011d8e914f4ba68d1443c7ae0dd15bdf0bc300994dd5282710aa", "difficulty": 165971.1181999981, "verificationprogress": 0.9999992572690658, "chainwork": "0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000002e8314e4484da", "pruned": false, "commitments": 663480, 
La sincronizzazione in questo caso è terminata:"verificationprogress": 0.9999992572690658, (99,99999%)
Ora proviamo getwalletinfo
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getwalletinfo 
Risposta:
{ "walletversion": 60000, "balance": 0.00000000, "unconfirmed_balance": 0.00000000, "immature_balance": 0.00000000, "txcount": 0, "keypoololdest": 1528833903, "keypoolsize": 101, "paytxfee": 0.00000000 } [email protected]:~$ 
Proviamo a ricevere dei BTCP da un wallet esterno, per prima cosa abbiamo bisogno di un transparent address da comunicare a chi ci invia i BTCP. Lo otteniamo con il comando getnewaddress:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getnewaddress 
Risposta: otteniamo un indirizzo (le xxx le ho aggiunte per mascherarlo)
b1Cabjwvcce7N8ea9Gxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx [email protected]:~$ 
Inviate con un vostro wallet grafico o con electrum pochi BTCP, io ne ho mandati 0.01 per prova, dopo che li avete inviati, verificate se sono arrivati:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getwalletinfo 
Risposta:
{ "walletversion": 60000, "balance": 0.00000000, "unconfirmed_balance": 0.01000000, "immature_balance": 0.00000000, "txcount": 1, "keypoololdest": 1528833903, "keypoolsize": 101, "paytxfee": 0.00000000 } 
Arrivati ! "Unconfirmed balance" 0.01! non sono ancora confermati, quindi aspettate un po' e ripetete il comando:
"walletversion": 60000, "balance": 0.01000000, "unconfirmed_balance": 0.00000000, "immature_balance": 0.00000000, "txcount": 1, "keypoololdest": 1528833903, "keypoolsize": 101, "paytxfee": 0.00000000 
Adesso balance è 0.01 perfetto!
Proviamo adesso ad inviare questi BTCP ad un nuovo T-Address, per semplicità li invierò ad un indirizzo di questo wallet
Generiamo un nuovo indirizzo per riceverli:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getnewaddress 
Otteniamo:
b1Nb42GoK9kmsxxxxxxxxxxxxx 
copiamo l'indirizzo e usiamo il comando sendtoaddress "btcpaddress" amount ( "comment" "comment-to" subtractfeefromamount )
il parametro subtractfeefromamount puo' essere true or false a seconda se vogliamo che le fee vengano detratte dall'ammontare inviato o meno. Io invio tutto quanto al nuovo indirizzo e quindi le fee vanno dedotte da questo:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli sendtoaddress "b1Nb42GoK9kmsxxxxxxxxxxxxx" 0.01 "" "" true 
Risposta:
2c5d3d1a3b5eec414b721d3817487f53c5eebxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx [email protected]:~$ 
Controlliamo cosa è successo:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getwalletinfo 
Risposta:
{ "walletversion": 60000, "balance": 0.00999808, "unconfirmed_balance": 0.00000000, "immature_balance": 0.00000000, "txcount": 2, "keypoololdest": 1528833903, "keypoolsize": 101, "paytxfee": 0.00000000 } 
Come vedete i BTCP sono diminuiti, perchè sono stati spostati su un nuovo indirizzo dello stesso wallet, pagando le fee. Ora vediamo esattamente dove sono e dove erano:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli listreceivedbyaddress 
Risposta:
[ { "address": "b1Ep2wi2tUnKf433Vaxxxxxxxxxxxx", "account": "", "amount": 0.01000000, "confirmations": 6, "txids": [ "833533440a13c09fda6e90d0c5xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx" ] }, { "address": "b1Nb42GoK9kmsVZ9KPxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "account": "", "amount": 0.00999808, "confirmations": 1, "txids": [ "2c5d3d1a3b5eec414b721d3817487f53c5xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx" ] } 
Questo comando vi da informazione di tutti gli indirizzi usati, vediamo solo gli indirizzi non spesi: listunspent
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli listunspent 
Risposta:
[ { "txid": "2c5d3d1a3b5eec414b721d381748xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "vout": 0, "generated": false, "address": "b1Nb42GoK9kxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "account": "", "scriptPubKey": "76a914c6bdf3bc8aedxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "amount": 0.00999808, "confirmations": 6, "spendable": true 
Ottimo!
Ora possiamo provare un comando che ci permette di estrarre la chiave provata da un indirizzo pubblico. Questo puo' essete utile in occasione di Fork o Airdrop per estrarre le monete.
ATTENZIONE: esporre a terzi le chiavi private è rischioso. Potrebbero rubare tutto il contenuto. Fate molta attenzione. Estraete le private keys solo se necessario o per fare delle prove su indirizzi che contengono pochi spicci. In ogni caso, dopo aver usato la private key meglio non riutilizzare quell'indirizzo.
Il comando da utilizzare è dumpprivkey T-ADDRESS
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli dumpprivkey b1Ep2wi2tUnxxxxxxxxxxx 
L'output sarà tipo il seguente, al solito la chiave è mascherata con delle xxxxxx
Kz29e62Bmxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 
Ora proviamo lo swipe della chiave, cioè il wallet andrà a cercare nella blockchain tutti gli importi collegati a quella pvt key, : importprivkey "btcpprivkey" ( "label" rescan )
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli importprivkey "Kz29e62Bmxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx" "" true 
Ora proviamo a fare delle Shielded Transaction, queste transazioni utilizzano la tecnologia zk-Snark per mascherare importi e indirizzi. Per prima cosa dobbiamo ottenere un indirizzo Shielded dal nostro wallet.
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli z_getnewaddress 
Eccolo generato:
zkEvCiVwgHb3NFi2ee9HGPjno2xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 
Vediamo dove sono i nostri BTCP, al momento sono solo su indirizzi Transparent:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli z_gettotalbalance 
Answer:
{ "transparent": "0.00999808", "private": "0.00", "total": "0.00999808" } 
ora mandiamo qualche BTCP all'indirizzo z_address. Per prima cosa dobbiamo recuperare l'indirizzo t-address dove si trovano:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli listunspent 
Eccoli:
[ { "txid": "72f568d1ed51524b69f1xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "vout": 0, "generated": false, "address": "b1LDhxBJxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "scriptPubKey": "76axxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxe088xx", "amount": 0.00889808, "confirmations": 556, "spendable": true } ] 
Adesso mandiamo un po' di BTCP all'indirizzo Shielded che abbiamo ottenuto sopra. Il comando è abbastanza complicato ma funziona cosi':
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli z_sendmany "b1LDhxBJxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx" "[{\"amount\":0.001, \"address\":\"zkEvCiVwgHb3xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx\"}]" 
Risultato:
opid-xxxxxxx-36c4-xxxx-beb2-xxxxxxxxxxxx 
Una transazione zk-Snark è piuttosto pesante da elaborare, il mio vecchio PC ci mette un po'. Meglio disattivare processi inutili. Si puo' controllare se l'operazione è andata a buon fine:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli z_getoperationresult 
al termine dovreste ricevere il seguente output:
[ { "id": "opid-xxxxxx-xxxxx-4a5d-beb2-xxxxxxxxxx", "status": "success", "creation_time": 1529426885, "result": { "txid": "f87e8d5e96a8a0xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx" }, "execution_secs": 216.686332567, "method": "z_sendmany", "params": { "fromaddress": "b1LDhxxxxxxxxxxx", "amounts": [ { "amount": 0.001, "address": "zkEvCiVwgHb3NFxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxR" } ], "minconf": 1, "fee": 0.0001 } } ] 
Fatto! Sul mio vecchio PC ci sono voluti 216,68 secondi!
La prossima prova sarà un invio da indirizzo Shielded a Transparent.
Play with your full node wallet and have fun.Remember: these commands are almost the same in all the bitcoin based coins, so you also learnt how to use many other wallets!
submitted by xivan71 to u/xivan71 [link] [comments]

My Consulting Rate Schedule || Why you can't have nice things and be ungrateful

My new home, if you want free advice, subscribe.

https://www.reddit.com/EthMiningClub/

My background:
My Rates - I'll scale by age, makes sense to me
Note: If I don't like you, for whatever reason at this point, there is a 10 Eth / Hour Asshole surcharge
These prices are completely arbitrary that I just pulled out of my ass, pay them , don't pay them, I don't care. If anyone PMs me in regards to help going forward, they will just get a link to this post.
What you get: * 1 hr phone and / or video conference call. Ask me how my day was, ask me technical question - your choice * 15m free phone / video call follow up
You can pay me for my time & experience or you can spend 300 dicking around with your own rigs yourself (Like I did) - I really don't care either way. I just wanted to post this here so I don't need to retype this 10 times a day when people ask me for help from this sub.
Cheers.
-Epic
Edit: Just if you can't Math ( as lots of people here can't ) EVERY 1/mhs you LOSE because your rig is not optimized Equates to .5 Eth / Month LOSS. Do the math on what you are losing. Here - 20/mhs loss = 10 Eth / Month * $8.25 ( Current Rate ) = $82.5. If Eth goes to $20 that is $200 per month on coins you lost ONLY because you did not apply the right settings for your cards. This should make my "fee" look cheap in comparison if you're running multiple cards. And if Eth goes to $1,000 in a few years like Bitcoin did, you will have some serious regrets.

Note: "My rates peak as high as 128MH/s.. so my average will probably be in the 115MH/s range. When I try the local/global-work code and/or setting the allocation percentage higher than 95%, I get errors. Can't remember what specifically.. something about failing to grab DAG info in one big chunk and 'bailing'."

"Hey thank you for the help on etherminer. I finally got the 6-GPU rig up and running. Windows turned out to be more of a headache than Ubuntu so I went back to Linux and figured it out. As per your suggestion I am on ethermine.org using qtminer. (I'm actually offline at the moment, but everything is operational) I used the default qtminer code that tells all of the GPUs to work but it's not entirely clear what is happening. Each GPU appears to be working on the same 'problem'. Is that accurate? As opposed to having each GPU work more independently on a separate problem..? I set the GPU workload to 93%.. Fans to 90%.. everything running cool at ~50c The results of most of the mining calculations appear to get grouped and uploaded to the pool as some sort of 'piece of the puzzle'. Every so often there is a 'solution' with a 'nonce'. How does that relate to getting an ETH reward? Also, how does the affect getting paid so long as the same address is used? I referenced a tutorial and accidentally used .rig1 to initialize qtminer - instead of the name of my computer (I still used my wallet address). I don't understand how all of this impacts getting paid or what my options are for tweaking the configuration. I'll sort it out either way but any additional insight is appreciated. ..single Ether sent as a token of gratitude... https://etherscan.io/tx/0x9782d0cfb5f98cf086e879cc510fd45968aef3a9798ee4281b475bc569eb5c11 (Tx ID was posted) Cheers"

These are the type of PMs I get on a daily basis and 100% can help you with within an hours time.

submitted by EpicEther to EtherMining [link] [comments]

My Consulting Rate Schedule / Experience - If you want serious work done or advice that would take me hours to explain

My background:
My Rates - I'll scale by age, makes sense to me
Note: If I don't like you, for whatever reason at this point, there is a 10 Eth / Hour Asshole surcharge These prices are completely arbitrary, pay them , don't pay them, I don't care. Going forward, if anyone PMs me in regards to help , they will just get a link to this post. Pretty much wrote all of this up to save myself time from 100 PMs a day from ungrateful people at /EtherMining
What you get: * 1 hr phone and / or video conference call. * Ask me how my day was, ask me technical question - your choice * 15m free phone / video call follow up * I am a reasonable guy, if I projected an issue to be done in x hours and it's not fixed by that time, I'll stay on the line until it is
You can pay me for my time & experience or you can spend 500 messing around with your own rigs yourself (Like I did) - It is completely your choice. This is more of an option for people who have extra crash and don't have time time to put in like I did.

Cheers,

-Epic™

Edit: Just if you can't Math ( as lots of people can't - no big deal ) EVERY 1/mhs you LOSE because your rig is not optimized Equates to .5 Eth / Month LOSS. Do the math on what you are losing. Here - 20/mhs loss = 10 Eth / Month * $8.25 ( Current Rate ) = $82.5. If Eth goes to $20 that is $200 per month on coins you lost ONLY because you did not apply the right settings for your cards. This should make my "fee" look cheap in comparison if you're running multiple cards. And if Eth goes to $1,000 in a few years like Bitcoin did, you will have some serious regrets.
PM: Pro Bono Consulting Client:
"My rates peak as high as 128MH/s.. so my average will probably be in the 115MH/s range. When I try the local/global-work code and/or setting the allocation percentage higher than 95%, I get errors. Can't remember what specifically.. something about failing to grab DAG info in one big chunk and 'bailing'."
PM: Pro Bono Consulting Client:
"Hey thank you for the help on etherminer. I finally got the 6-GPU rig up and running. Windows turned out to be more of a headache than Ubuntu so I went back to Linux and figured it out. As per your suggestion I am on ethermine.org using qtminer. (I'm actually offline at the moment, but everything is operational) I used the default qtminer code that tells all of the GPUs to work but it's not entirely clear what is happening. Each GPU appears to be working on the same 'problem'. Is that accurate? As opposed to having each GPU work more independently on a separate problem..? I set the GPU workload to 93%.. Fans to 90%.. everything running cool at ~50c The results of most of the mining calculations appear to get grouped and uploaded to the pool as some sort of 'piece of the puzzle'. Every so often there is a 'solution' with a 'nonce'. How does that relate to getting an ETH reward? Also, how does the affect getting paid so long as the same address is used? I referenced a tutorial and accidentally used .rig1 to initialize qtminer - instead of the name of my computer (I still used my wallet address). I don't understand how all of this impacts getting paid or what my options are for tweaking the configuration. I'll sort it out either way but any additional insight is appreciated. ..single Ether sent as a token of gratitude... https://etherscan.io/tx/0x9782d0cfb5f98cf086e879cc510fd45968aef3a9798ee4281b475bc569eb5c11 (Tx ID was posted) Cheers"
PM: Corporate Client: This is a real PM I received and the type of PM I will respond to if you want to work with me -
"Dear EpicEther, My name is [Real First AND Last name] and i live and study in the [Country] ( Public administration and Philosophy at [School Name] University. Me and four partners are setting up a mining company after building a succesfull mining rig containing 5 r9 280x cards. At the moment we have potential investors and a brochure containing information about ethereum and different mining set-up's with estimated costs for the inestors. I would really like to have a conversation with a veteran in the mining world and woud like to discus the following questions. - Is investing in more expensive GPU's worth it since mining will be faced out in the coming year. - How can we help to grow the ethereum network Kind regards, [Real Full Name]"

These are the type of PMs I get on a daily basis and 100% can help you with within an hours time.

submitted by EpicEther to EthMiningClub [link] [comments]

Backing wallet up

I am new to the burstcoin scene and I am using ubuntu 16.04. I am just wondering how do I back up the wallet? Most importantly, how do I start mining with it? I don't have a working discrete gpu. I try to install burstminer r4 but there isn't much tutorial to go with. In addition where can I find my wallet address (top left)?
/Downloads/burstcoin-1.2.8/burst-miner-mastebin$ ./burstminer

Burst cryptoport Miners

http://github.com/uraymeiviaburst-miner author : uray meiviar [ [email protected] ] please donate to support developments : [ Burst ] BURST-8E8K-WQ2F-ZDZ5-FQWHX [ Bitcoin ] 1UrayjqRjSJjuouhJnkczy5AuMqJGRK4b
using config file : mining.conf No valid plot file or directory in config file mining.conf Aborting program due to invalid configuration
submitted by weaponizedAutismbux to burstcoin [link] [comments]

Dogecoin help. Lots of questions

Hi everyone. Long time lurker here and in the bitcoin subreddit but I like this sub better :). Much love and friendship lol. I want to get started with some dogecoin (NOT BEGGING FOR TIPS) and I would like to mine some and maybe buy some too. Is there a way to buy doge with USD or must it be with BTC? Also I tried to install the mining software but it was too confusing and I couldn't get it working. Is there any good tutorials yo get started with mining? I run a dual boot with windows and Ubuntu so instructions for neither one works. Also, which site listed in the dogecoin page is bettemore accurate in terms of conversion rates. What is the most common/used site for dogecoin transactions an wallets? Are there any less-trustworthy or bad sites that I should avoid (thinkMtGox or coinbase for bitcoin)?. Overall I just want to get started and feel like I am lacking information to make an educated decision. I would appreciate any help offered. Thanks :)
Sorry for spelling. On mobile
submitted by SixCrazyMexicans to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Comprehensive guide to safely browse the SilkRoad

Summary
I) INTRODUCTION
II) SOFTWARES & LINKS
III) ENCRYPTION USING TRUECRYPT
IV) CREATION OF A VIRTUAL MACHINE USING VBOX
V) TWEAKS TO VBOX
VI) INSTALLING AND SETTING UP LINUX
VII) INSTALLING TOR
VIII) SHORT INTRODUCTION TO PGP VIA TERMINAL
IX) ADDITIONAL THOUGHTS
I) INTRODUCTION
First of all, I'm no security expert. The following guide will be nothing but technical instructions to securing your machine to make digital information storage and transmission secure.
Your security is divided in 3 parts. Also remember your security (as in lowering chances to get caught) is only as strong and your weakest link. Those 3 parts are :
a) Money
You can (and will) get caught if you aren't careful with how you move money. Banks and LE work hand-in-hand to trace money. I won't cover that aspect but you need a bulletproof way of buying (if you are a buyer) and/or selling (if you are a seller) your bitcoins.
b) Drugs
Yes, you'll get caught if you don't handle drugs in a secure fashion, ldo. It includes shipping, stealthing, receiving packages, storing. You get the idea.
c) Information
Here is the part I'll develop in this guide. How to handle information (mostly digital information) to not get caught and be as stealthy as possible.
II) SOFTWARES USED AND LINKS
All the following softwares are :
1) Free - you don't have (and shouldn't, as sad as it sounds for security reasons) to pay anything to fully use them
2) Open source - Anyone with knowledge can see what the programs are made of. Def a security plus.
We will need (In order of use) :
a) a good anti-virus
Before even starting the job, we need to make sure we're working in a safe environnement. If you have a keylogger installed on your computer then all futur steps will be for NOTHING. So if you don't have an updated AV installed yet, get one. I personally use AVG. Here is the link but it's recommended you search it yourself using google, after all, I could be a hacker myself.
http://free.avg.com/
b) a password manager
You'll need to save at least 5 complex passwords. I strongly recommend using a password manager (with passwords creation) such as KeePass. It's multi plateform (windows/linux/android).
http://keepass.info/
c) TrueCrypt
Very powerful piece of software which allows you to encrypt files/folder or even full system partition using bulletproof algorythm such as AES.
http://www.truecrypt.org/
d) VirtualBox
Very powerful software which allows you to run a completely autonom virtual machine inside your physical machine.
https://www.virtualbox.org
e) Ubuntu 13.04
Free OS. Very safe. Not so user friendly but you'll only use it to browse SilkRoad and use PGP (more on that later).
http://www.ubuntu.com/
d) Tor Browser Bundle (TBB)
A package of pre-configured software to use TOR. Awesome.
https://www.torproject.org/projects/torbrowser.html.en
III) ENCRYPTION USING TRUECRYPT
I assume you already installed the antivirus and ran a minutious scan on your system. Your system was clean already ? Great, you can read what's next.
So first, we want to create an encrypted folder so that we can install a complete different OS in it. It'll be 100% safe and impossible (without the passphrase ldo) to know what it is you are putting in the folder.
a) Click on "Create Volume"
b) Select "Create an encrypted file container"
c) Select "Standard TrueCrypt volume"
note : Do your research on which option you want to use.
d) For Volume Location, select where you want to save the file. Type in a random name and click "save" then "Next" !! Note : You can select a USB pendrive (with at least 10GB and USB 3.0 strongly recommended) so that you have a portable, encrypted OS. Very useful since that you can physically hide it from LE in case of a search at your place) !!
e) Encryption Options
I advise to use AES. The technology is old which, in security, is a good thing since it means it has been tested by many security experts. I don't know about Hash Algorithm. I think I use RIPEMD-160 but it's up to you to do your godamn research on which option you want to use.
f) Volume Size
Pick at least 10gb, (no more than 15GB really). Note : TrueCrypt will encrypt the whole 10GB no matter what it is you put in, even empty space. So consider the number you type in (10GB here) as gone once you click "Next".
g) Volume Password
Open KeePass (!!!!!!!! with a strong masterpassword !!!!!!!!) and generate a random passphrase using at least 15 (25+ advised) characters (with lowercase, uppercase, numbers, symbols, space everything checked). Save it carefully, and copy paste it twice in TryeCrypt.
h) Large Files
Select "Yes"
i) Volume Format
Move your mouse randomly (to create randomness in the Key) a few seconds then click "Format", wait.
Congratulation, you now are the owner of an encrypted file container.
IV) CREATION OF A VIRTUAL MACHINE USING VIRTUALBOX
First, you need to mount the encrypted folder you just created. For this, open TrueCrypt, and click on random letter (remember it and always use the same to avoid corruption). I personally use R: (don't ask me why, I guess I used it the first time and it stuck). Then, click on "Select File" and browse to your newly created folder, click on "Open". Then, click on "Mount", it'll ask for your passphrase. Open it with KeePass and copy past it. Click "OK". If everything went well, you can know access your encrypted folder using Windows Explorer in computer. Truecrypt created a virtual partition.
Okay, so now, off to creating a Virtual Machine. You must have downloaded Ubuntu 13.04 (700MO or so). Good, save the .iso file somwhere.
a) Open VirtualBox, click on "New". In name, type in Ubuntu, it'll automatically select the type and version needed. Click "Next".
b) Memory Size. It's the amount of RAM you want to allocate to your virtual machine. I personally have 12GB of RAM and I allocated 4096MO to my VM (virtual machine). Note : Consider that the amount of RAM you give to your VM gone from your physical machine. Even if you don't run anything on your VM, the amount given (4096MO) won't be usable by your physical machine until you shutdown your VM. Click "Next".
c) Hard-Drive. Select "Create a virtual hard drive now", click "Create".
d) Type of hard drive file Select "VDI (Image disk VirtualBox)" Click "Next".
e) Select "Fixed Size", click "Next".
f) File location and size For location, click the yellow folder and go to the letter you mounted the file in TrueCrypt (for me R:\the-name-of-your-VM.vdi) In size, pick whatever the amount of GB you allocated to the crypted folder MINUS 1.5GB. !! Note : very important. For exemple, if your crypted folder is 10GB, you must pick 8,50 Gio. !! Click "Create" and wait a minute or two for VBox to create your VM.
V) TWEAKS TO VBOX
Here are the settings I use for my SilkRoad Machine.
To access settings, in VirtualBox, select your newly created VM and click "Configuration". Go to the onglet "System" => "Proc", select a reasonnable Value (where the green and red meets is generally ok). Type in 90% in allocated ressources. Go to the onglet "Display" => "Video", select a reasonnable Value (where the green and red meets is generally ok). Number of screen, 1 by default. You can use more screens if you have more than one. Vbox supports it beautifully. Click "OK".
VI) INSTALLING AND SETTING UP LINUX
a) Open VBox, select your virtual machine in the left and click "Start" at the top. You now are running your virtual machine.
Now you must install Linux on it. A window will pop up and ask you to select a booting disk. Click the yellow folder and browse to the Ubuntu.iso file you previously downloaded. Click on "Start".
You VM will now boot using Ubuntu. Install it, check "Download updated while installing", leave everything else as is.
Select "Erase disk and install Ubuntu". File in the settings needed. In name, type whatever you want (note : I usually just type in the same letter I used to mount the folder with TrueCrypt). Pick a password (a new fresh password, that one isn't necessarily important but make sure you remember it). Select "Require my password to log in", you don't mind extra lawyers of security. Click "Continue". Now, wait, the installation can take up to an hour or two.
When done, click on "Restart Now". When rebooting, you will be asked to if you want to boot using the installation, DON'T anything and wait. Now you have a beautiful orange/purple page asking you for your password. Type in the password you wrote during the installation process and press Enter. Welcome to Ubuntu.
b) You need to setup a few things.
First, you can go fullscreen pressing Right CTRL + F (the CTRL next to the arrows on the right of your keyboard). Better, right ?
You'll notice those black borders onto the sides. That's ugly and bad for your eyes. To remediate, you need to install a pack of drivers especially made for Virtual machines.
To do so, put your cursor to the very bottom center of your screen (if you are in fullscreen mode, else you have access to the options at the very top of the window). Click on "Peripheric", Click on "Install Guest Additions". An autorun window will open up, select "Run Software" and click "OK". Enter your Ubuntu password. Click "Authenticate". An ugly purple window will open with ugly white characters, it's the terminal. We'll use it later for different stuff. Wait a minute or two until you have the terminal says this "Press Return to close this window...". Press Return on your keyboard (above Enter) to close the window, ldo.
Reboot the virtual machine by going to the very top right of your screen. Now to go the options, on the left, you'll see a dock of icons, click the Gear with the Red hammer or whatever you call it in english (I know it's not a hammer). Double click on "Displays", pick your favorite resolution. Click "Apply" then "Keep that resolution". Much better, cierto ?
You will notice the OS seems slow and laggy, even more so if you installed your VM on a USB pendrive. To remediate, follow those steps.
Run the terminal (push ALT + F2 and type in "Terminal", double click to open it. Copy past that command :
/uslib/nux/unity_support_test -p
The following should appear :
Not software rendered: no
Not blacklisted: yes
GLX fbconfig: yes
GLX texture from pixmap: yes
GL npot or rect textures: yes
GL vertex program: yes
GL fragment program: yes
GL vertex buffer object: yes
GL framebuffer object: yes
GL version is 1.4+: yes
Unity 3D supported: no
As you can see, 3D acceleration isn't activated. To activate it, return to terminal and copy past that command, enter password when asked. When "asked to continue [Y/n] ?", type in Y then press enter.
sudo bash -c 'echo vboxvideo >> /etc/modules'
Shutdown the virtual machine (you can do it manually inside the VM or press Right CTRL + Q and select "Send extinction signal".
Go back to VirtualBox and go to configuration => display. Check Activate 3D acceleration.
Boot your VM, open terminal and type
/uslib/nux/unity_support_test -p
You should now see that Unity 3D is supported and your OS is fluid. Don't expect native performances tho, it's still an emulated OS.
VII) INSTALLING TOR
Run your VM. Open a firefox window and go to https://www.torproject.org/projects/torbrowser.html.en
Select the Linux version and download it. Close Firefox. We want to use that machine on the clearweb as little as possible.
Unpack (or drag&drop) the tor-browser_en-US folder in the folder "Home" or desktop or whervere you want.
Open the folder and double click on "start-tor-browser". It will open a weird text editor with gibberish stuff in it. Close it. We need to activate an option first.
Push ALT, in that window, type "dconf-editor" and press Enter. In dconfg-editor go to: org => gnome => nautilus =>preferences Click on "executable-text-activation" and from drop down menu select: "launch: to launch scripts as programs." Close dconf-editor.
You can now launch TOR. and browse anonymously the road. I strongly advise you to install KeePass for linux by going to Ubuntu Software Center to save passwords for Silkroad as well as your PGP passphrase.
VIII) SHORT INTRODUCTION TO PGP VIA THE LINUX TERMINAL
PGP is a powerful protocal that allows you to encrypt and decrypt messages and files. It has been used for over 15 years and is the standard all over the world for industry and governement communications.
So first, we must create our own set of keys.
A) Creating your own keys
To do so, open the terminal and type GPG. It will reply :
gpg: Go ahead and type your message ...
Ok, you've got GPG installed already, perfect.
To create your key, type :
gpg --gen-key
Type 1 then hit Enter
You'll be asked to chose between 1024 and 4096 bits. Chose 4096 (the most secure), hit Enter.
Next window, type 0, press Enter, then type Y, press Enter.
You are now asked to enter your name, it's important you don't type in your Real Name obviously but it's also important to chose something that identifies you. I chose my Silkroad name so that my contacts know the key is mine.
Email adress : [email protected] or whatever you want, shouldn't be real.
Comment : none, press Enter
Type in "O" to confirm, press Enter
Enter passphrase, very important to chose something very secure. As usual, open up KeePass and generate a strong passphrase, there is no limitation AFAIK.
Then you'll be asked to do random stuff on your computer to generate bytes to ensure randomness in your key pool. Do stuff, open a random file and type in stuff for exemple. Once it's done (it can take a few minutes), you now have your own set of keys.
What we want to do know is to export the public key so that you can share it with your sellers/buyers.
Type :
gpg --armor --export your-email-adress-used-before
Copy paste the public key in a .txt file on your desktop and share it whenever you buy/sell.
B) Importing a public key
To send a message to someone, you must important its key. To do so, create a document and copy paste the key there, close & save it.
Now, open seahorse (hit ALT and type in Seahorse, open the program called "Passwords and keys".
Put your cursor in the very top left of your screen and click file => import, select the file you saved the key in. Done.
C) Encrypting a message
Open the terminal and type :
gpg -ear name-or-email-of-your-contact < Press Enter Type your message
Press Enter, finish by typing "end" and press Enter again.
You'll have your encrypted message. Something that looks like that :
-----BEGIN PGP MESSAGE----- Version: GnuPG v1.4.12 (GNU/Linux)
hQIMA7eD31/5BBRZAQ/9Hq1r1gpOIf2r06zSIL8Ww0tUCC9PlNiMpemPwhpZsccB vO4MOMrnV41BHToTQNfh0xiZdXFxO/T6ow4oatP2Ap/BvZtipcAAjJKowP6aaTOJ Wgd7nC4FTJvRUjgkW/p3imlQsdTVb3+2dNzCPp0yrr8NocW77+4Ka/+4aoql0UmI 3mKLjo0+eof8qAnQd5jOaAcWTszhIwBd99rXVbRCjNa/jMsSQ9Vnn7L+WqYGHuAI MMdOCU3peifV/7zA6A0bMKzStWc1JIa84wus91/mmErkRcNZHqThCje8eulinzRm RthaH0yi7ty65F3IuSqbq/qdpdE9UXvwjySbFE7ANCPpnkP4jv+oL95UezyjbO2x ra1Il7XKbYvaf0oXJAz5xKsLfeHKB3kCR+Kxzt9NmdRZ4rPZ4ZjSN5WI9YeOL0t/ W7oaCyBcFD/6/m/63VNYZTrwrqBGqsWhXVFpoHalvd+09CffsdQjwDIMy9u3TtRk j+FDSGuukKrS/7exWSoajSDhTK+koSS8CIFvyocZ81EkGhnUjd4kxlIAu4UCXmG6 LiJXXo7X5PK7knGtlzZXstrtrrttr8FFeAbSHsZ0+ihdxtNSvx1EPewl TtLSKoUT9ickUrxFoPm2z1vqBwN/087EaCU6BSX8uwZ8GrxMwSKgVmQKfVyfgMDS RAGGtmuRwgfyhthrertwF0KV8nTajDnSqoGiMAgK7y+e320OEFnYXOKIXlue l7FvOHwi9jZbBAR4HHAfhgJIj78P =OT60 -----END PGP MESSAGE-----
You can now send the encrypted message to your contact.
D) Decrypting messages
Open the terminal and type :
gpg -da < Press enter, then copy paste the message you received. Press Enter, finish by tiping end then press Enter again.
You will be asked to enter the passphrase to decrypt it. Open KeePass and copy paste it. The result will be like this :
You need a passphrase to unlock the secret key for user: "abcd [email protected]" 4096-bit RSA key, ID xx, created 2013-05-08 (main key ID xxx)
gpg: encrypted with 4096-bit RSA key, ID xxx, created 2013-05-08 "abcd [email protected]" ENCRYPTED MESSAGE TO THE SILK ROAD HERE
You can now safely converse with your vendors.
IX) ADDITIONAL THOUGHTS
I hope everything worked well. Finally, the most important security advice someone can give is to use your brain. Don't do anything stupid and you should be fine.
Feel free to discuss issues you may have encontered here or by PM, I'll gladly help you getting setup.
Remember also that your security is only as good as your contacts security. For exemple, if your seller is stupid and keeps detailed informations of his buyers on file, then there isn't much you can do in case he gets caught.
I could have sold this tutorial but I chose not to because my personnal security is guaranteed only if yours is aswell. You get my point.
MUST BE ANONYMOUS
-----BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK----- Version: GnuPG v1.4.12 (GNU/Linux)
mQENBFGIAIUBCAC75V2SJ50dU6+gUY7jdrHxJKmdjXjlOxWjE+CTuti+Pq8NveTK aPXWHmFZpsEtW+v7tHmPPT/cjEKlmo/B9Wxl9daFis+6gFQHnaKNRCFVmOSt9GL8 7qBxrxC/HZTeBgdE8dWf4RPSc911PRb2+iCCrdgj+5ILwp3fcM5EHoRqKiFDpb3A fybrw3prvpPx8dyt1H/p73S6Gfk+Iuwcq2+iIAMJUJQUc+CwMFFCplQ1BUeiD+nn 5o24FXF9Krcbw8w5lZCfPVPSh0GYTvNMaj1VWjEQFU4j0rCOiJ+UVckpgJ4MRrxI MbKJ8srGLSJRnCHM2syQC0Zq/2iwRuZY7zWXABEBAAG0EVdoYXRzdXA1NiA8YUBi LmM+iQE4BBMBAgAiBQJRiACFAhsDBgsJCAcDAgYVCAIJCgsEFgIDAQIeAQIXgAAK CRBioWhoc3JRsCrhB/9M2AptCTjyitpQR1ZnqwFop/NDdOIY1DtERkyQKfbHftzK 5I/LI3wxP5rhts2NY/EMVl8ziJVZ7h0J9japkoia8uOYX9Un6aMasHM0PH7Mln2K 936BeoZDQbPQV8NOCyNT4lMNt7Ajd+6GJcmAIduPmUi6xjgge716MhQlTBg5HG 94ZJT3Xm7W9tuIiJh8H9Dkr60F9UuwtIPfKPEeXyxUI25fZAQ+nyVz39ap2fjyeW EYMB6y90zxWjFPiFfpx+BfcWOmzHaXkps/bG6kSbOcVn9UJS32C0JyIFmfa96N6H +tSmk+WW98u5dSBzhIoYYiXxWPihJDOjTCUYkFC9uQENBFGIAIUBCADrkKs31LOL 4MQ6fdzhw2MvTI8zDad2bJZCd/+Gf8yGTNKhagJIHo8KEuCDINydQXHCt+aNKZZ7 d/QG09nABaybZJfqf1ffOiD5L1PivcKJMdJNozNuIhWxc4E35A7c/wCPJdDOBV0v eqf57illUo+yz7CKfyO088BYMGTrBRi/ifqmPyMuYzzC4SZcx1MJFU1mzONYU1r0 ZYj0eeKdRrbHPfJUAWQUr6MteMvJp5g8JfyYC+Th+zASEYRRfs3I52rsLb1hpxoi 87xUK89xoXdg4uLysz1Iy/PhGjmtbi61sZCv1oh+o9biNsy9zIjqwhCW7oMPwmJ6 Szh2nNTMCuNFABEBAAGJAR8EGAECAAkFAlGIAIUCGwwACgkQYqFoaHNyUbBKWAf5 AbYVbQVRNYVw5pR6+NDLw1qxlafGz/7j6YnApif0vuVzBEE9aFOUdxfKyIy+Ka8l NYjoAItym2mDTsRZqJwEm1FPbmVFu7WPAnnmn1ECyHBSV0vnJjCL5qkoMx9d/EHs WBW7htnRVtbuJEzVZzzSfddjWEYXGqYcqocebBwQpNgdfuQrHadAbkSmDwLfz+KD r17m1i9sUej8hiFLr64XGau7nl2l+iRMR2vTcVpNZDTJa/t4JlrwMINR95ORo3ze bRVKbedZIn3ifeSzyWDTsScvkNVAe4dovATaHWU/+tkNgL4ECI1UNS8XYsGqWe+r pbfj19eRRPAc4lbNfLlUKQ== =aq6t -----END PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
edit : Fixed a few typos.Reorganized chapters using roman letters.
submitted by MUST-BE-ANONYMOUS to SilkRoad [link] [comments]

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How to mine Bitcoin Using Linux [2019]

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